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David McKenzie's blog

Annals of Misleading Statistics: Literacy 83

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On the World Bank’s today page today I saw the following:

This seemed really high to me, and a strange way of presenting statistics. Following the link, it directs you to this World Bank Data Viz Tumblir which has a bunch of statistics all presented in the form, if the World had only 100 people, then…

Does gender matter in migration? Why I don’t believe any studies which claim it does

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Since I’ve had three emails in one week asking me about this issue, I figured I might as well blog about it and have something to refer people to instead. The questions have all been variants of:

·         Are women better remitters than men?

·         Does having mothers migrate result in worse outcomes for kids than having their fathers migrate?

Friday links Feb 8: the impact of going to the Maldives, skills training in Liberia, plastic bag removal in San Fran and more...

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·         Early results from a skills training program for young women in Liberia show massive increases in employment and earnings – although a randomized pipeline design whereby the control group get the treatment about one year after the treatment group raise concerns about strategic delay by the control group and how long-term impacts could be measured.

Are John Henry Effects as Apocryphal as their Eponym?

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Many people are aware of the concept of a “placebo effect” in medicine and of the idea of a Hawthorne effect – in both cases the concern is that merely being treated can cause the treatment group in an intervention to change their behavior, regardless of what the treatment actually is.

Friday links February 1st: Blood Stealing, When to Replicate, the Perils of not realizing you will change, and more…

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·         Marc Bellemare discusses a new paper in Science which finds young people, middle-aged people, and older people all believed they had changed a lot in the past but would change relatively little in the future – leading people to overpay for

Blog Links Jan 17: The Impacts of Sisters and of no Siblings; Pre-school education; sensitive measurement, and more…

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·         A new paper in Science looks at the impacts of China’s one-child policy on personality, finding people born after the introduction of the policy were, not only less trusting, less trustworthy, and more pessimistic, but also less competitive, less conscientious, and more risk-averse. See this coverage in the The Scientist.

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