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David McKenzie's blog

Behavioral design: slap or tax yourself into productivity?

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One of those stories going the rounds about a month ago concerns a blogger in San Francisco, who worried he was wasting too much time on Facebook and Reddit. As he writes on his blog, he used a software app which tracked what he was doing with his time and found almost 19 hours a week went to these activities.

Does Angus Deaton worry too much about wolves eating his t-values?

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In his latest Letter from America in the Royal Economic Society’s newsletter, Angus Deaton says “your wolf is interfering with my t-value” (the title refers in part to regulations on hunting wolves in the American West) and talks about excessive regulation with NIH grants, and his concerns with the move towards trial registries:

Slowness in dealing with comments for the next 2 weeks

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The World Bank's blogs have recently come under an increasing number of spam comments, despite spam filters which already sometimes I struggle to get through! A new system will be up November 16th I've been told, so we should be able to more quickly approve comments after then. Until then:

- if you have a genuine comment, send us an email to let us know it is in there - or just email it to one of us and we are happy to post it for you.

- we will continue to never approve a spam comment, so stop wasting your and our time spammers.

A pre-analysis plan checklist

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A pre-analysis plan is a step-by-step plan setting out how a researcher will analyze data which is written in advance of them seeing this data (and ideally before collecting it in cases where the researcher is collecting the data). They are recently starting to become popular in the context of randomized experiments, with Casey et al. and Finkelstein et al.’s recent papers in the QJE both using them.

Tools of the Trade: A quick adjustment for multiple hypothesis testing

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As our impact evaluations broaden to consider more and more possible outcomes of economic interventions (an extreme example being the 334 unique outcome variables considered by Casey et al. in their CDD evaluation) and increasingly investigate the channels of impact through subgroup heterogeneity analysis, the issue of multiple hypothesis testing is gaining increasing prominence.

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