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David McKenzie's blog

A Review of the Imbens and Rubin Causal Inference Book

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Over the summer I’ve been slowly working my way through the new book Causal Inference for Statistics, Social, and Biomedical Sciences: An Introduction by Guido Imbens and Don Rubin. It is an introduction in the sense that it is 600 pages and still doesn’t have room for difference-in-differences, regression discontinuity, synthetic controls, power calculations, dealing with attrition, dealing with multiple time periods, treatment spillovers, or many other topics in causal inference (they promise a volume 2). But not an introduction in that it is graduate level and I imagine would be very confusing if you had no previous exposure to causal inference. So I thought I’d share some thoughts on this book for our readers.

A curated list of our postings on Measurement and Survey Design

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This list is a companion to our curated list on technical topics. It puts together our posts on issues of measurement, survey design, sampling, survey checks, managing survey teams, reducing attrition, and all the behind-the-scenes work needed to get the data needed for impact evaluations.
Measurement

A Curated List of Our Postings on Technical Topics – Your One-Stop Shop for Methodology

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This is a curated list of our technical postings, to serve as a one-stop shop for your technical reading. I’ve focused here on our posts on methodological issues in impact evaluation – we also have a whole lot of posts on how to conduct surveys and measure certain concepts that I’ll leave for another time. Updated August 20, 2015.
Random Assignment

Weekly links August 14: reducing the costs to formalize has no effect again, don’t trust the Mechanical Turk, and more…

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Weekly links July 31: Household surveys in crisis, Doing Business, machine learning, and more…

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  • Household surveys in crisis – Bruce Meyer and co-authors in a new NBER working paper highlight the many issues due to declining cooperation of respondents in the U.S.:
    • Unit nonresponse: Households have become increasingly less likely to answer surveys at all: nonresponse rates for major U.S. surveys like the CPS, SIPP, and GSS now exceed 20 percent

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