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Weekly Links May 1: Trends in Impact Evaluation, JHR Symposium on Empirical Methods, Superstar Inventors and more...

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  • The Growth Economics blog hits hard with “there’s more to life to manufacturing”, among other things, making the point that even the way we code industries and occupations is heavily biased towards manufacturing and misses most of the action taking part in services growth.

Are you teaching or taking a class in development economics in a developing country?

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This is a joint post with Anna Luisa Paffhausen
 
We are currently conducting a study and survey on how development economics is taught in developing countries and would love your help getting the word out and/or participating.
 
Our survey is meant to be a stocktaking and study of whether and how developing economics is taught as part of an economics course in developing countries. We are focusing on undergraduate and masters level classes.
The aim is to use this to understand the following questions:
 

Weekly links April 24: When behavioral phenomena work and when they don’t, marketing skills for small businesses, spillovers, and much more…

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Weekly links April 10: Online IE education x 3; monkeynomics, surveying under repression, and more…

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Weekly links April 3: scaling up in perspective, surveying with mobile apps, and more…

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  • Pew research on “what we learned about surveying with mobile apps”: “Immediate responses and feedback can be helpful and revealing” but “App response rates were lower than Web rates overall and for each of the 14 surveys we conducted”
  • Freakonomics asks “How do we know what really works in healthcare?” – a podcast about RCTs. I like this comment from a doctor about scaling up “I think Medicare’s comment was that it’s really hard to do. We’re not sure we could scale it. Well, we f***ing scaled open heart surgery. We scaled separating Siamese twins. We scaled transplanting hearts and lungs, curing complex cancers. We’re sequencing the human genome. You’re telling me we can’t have a nurse go out and check on your mom or grandmother in a highly organized, well-structured, well-trained intervention for which someone’s already doing it for hundreds and hundreds of patients every day?”

Can you measure flows over short periods? Aka why Justin Wolfers might (NOT) want to reconsider that parenting study

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[EDIT: I POSTED TOO HASTILY HERE, SEE AN ADDENDUM BELOW WHERE I AGREE WITH JUSTIN AFTER ALL]
Today in the Upshot, Justin Wolfers heavily criticizes a recent study that has received lots of media attention claiming that child outcomes are barely correlated with the time that parents spend with their children. He writes:

Tips for Randomization in the Wild: Adding a Waitlist

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This is a relatively small point, but one that has come up several times in conversations in the last few months, so I thought it worth noting here.
Context: you are randomly selecting people for some program such as a training program, transfer program, etc. in which you expect less than 100% take-up of the treatment from those assigned to treatment. You are relying on an oversubscription design, in which more people apply for the course/program than you have slots.

Blog links March 27: grants spur innovation, shaming tax scofflaws, the risks of piloting, why it is hard to work with academics, and more…

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  • Does shaming people to pay taxes work? Yes according to an experiment in the U.S., but only if they don’t owe too much. (h/t @dinapomeranz)
  • Chris Blattman offers his take on “Does Economics have an Africa problem?” – is it just me, or is is this whole debate a bit too Africa-centric? Economics has at least as much a Middle East problem, or Eastern Europe problem, or East Asia problem – in my view more if we compare the amount of research activity devoted to these other regions.
  • Sana Rafiq discusses how behavioral biases affect our survey questions on the Let’s Talk Development blog, in the context of trying to replicate some of Sendhil Mullainathan’s scarcity work: when asking whether people would travel across town to get a bargain, “There is no guarantee that the product will still be there once I go across town. It’s very likely that the product is gone by the time I get there.” Of course! By assuming the availability of the product, we had let our own implicit biases, based on our mental models, influence the design of the question.”

From my email correspondence: how to randomize in the field

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I received this email from one of our readers:
“I don't know as much about list experiments as I'd like.  Specifically, I have a question about administering them and some of the blocking procedures.  I read a few of the pieces you recently blogged about and have an idea for one of my own; however, here's what I'd like to know: when you send your interviewers or researchers out into the field to administer a list experiment, how do you ensure that they are randomly administering the control and treatment groups? (This applies to a developing country as opposed to a survey administered over the phone.) “
This question of how to randomize questions (or treatments) on the spot in the field is of course a much more general one. Here’s my reply:

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