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The Impact of Blogs Part II: Blogging enhances the blogger’s reputation. But, does it influence policy?

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On Monday, we examined the impact of blogs on downloads and citations. Today, in Part II (of a three or four part series over two weeks), we present our findings (and detail our efforts in doing so) to see whether blogging improves the blogger’s reputation as part of our paper in progress.

The Impact of Economic Blogs - Part I: Dissemination (aka check out these cool graphs!)

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There is a proliferation of economics blogs, with increasing numbers of famous and not-so-famous economists devoting a significant amount of time to writing blog entries, and in some cases, attracting large numbers of readers. Yet little is known about the impact of this new medium. Together we are writing a paper to try and measure various impacts of economics blogs and thought we’d share the results over a few blog posts – and hopefully get useful comments to improve the paper at the same time.

New research on getting people into jobs

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Jobs or the lack thereof dominate policy discussions around the world, with Governments everywhere facing a shortage of evidence as to which programs work in generating new employment and in helping particular groups of the unemployed find new jobs. I spent part of last week at the NBER summer institute, where papers in the Labor Studies and Entrepreneurship sessions were focused on employment.

An underappreciated benefit of experiments: convincing politicians when their pet projects don’t work

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New York City has suspended payments in a pay-for-performance program for teachers after an experiment found the program had not worked. From the New York Post:

Another attempt by the city to improve student performance through cash payments has failed, much to the surprise of Mayor Bloomberg.

Tell us – is there a missing market for collaboration on surveys between WB staff, researchers and students?

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The thought has occurred to me that there are more people than ever doing surveys of various sorts in developing countries, and many graduate students, young faculty, and other researchers who would love the opportunity to cheaply add questions to a survey. I therefore wonder whether there is a missed opportunity for the two sides to get together. Let me explain what I’m thinking of, and then let us know whether you think this is really an issue or not.

The Impact of Low-Skilled Migrants on High-Skilled Women’s Work

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Much of the debate about the effects of immigration on native workers focuses on possible negative consequences for wages or employment. However, a series of recent papers highlights a big positive effect – having immigrants as cleaners, nannies, and home-care assistants allows high-skilled women to work more.

The new big randomized trial that you should know about – randomized Medicaid

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Given the massive debate in the U.S. about government health insurance, the just released results of a new experiment are justly making headlines. In 2004, the state of Oregon, due to budgetary shortfalls, closed its public health insurance program for low-income people. In early 2008, the state decided it had enough budget to fund 10,000 new spots. Given that it expected demand for these new slots to far exceed supply, the state Government opened up a sign-up window, getting 90,000 people to sign-up for a waitlist, and then used random lottery draws to select people from the waitlist.

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