Syndicate content

Markus Goldstein's blog

Some theory on experimental design…with insight into those who run them

Markus Goldstein's picture
A nice new paper by Abhijit Banerjee, Sylvain Chassang, and Erik Snowberg brings theory to how we choose to do evaluations – with some interesting insights into those of us who do them.  It’s elegantly written, and full of interesting examples and thought experiments – well worth a read beyond the injustice I will do it here.  

Poverty reduction through large asset transfers: a look at the long run

Markus Goldstein's picture
Last year, Banerjee and coauthors published a paper in Science that showed the striking impacts of poverty graduation programs in 6 countries after three years.   This week, we get a new paper from Bandiera and coauthors that revisits one of the models of this type of program they wrote about in 2013 and looks not only at a wide range of benefits, but also at what happens in the longer run.  

Making a short presentation based on your research: 11 tips

Markus Goldstein's picture

Over the past few weeks, we’ve both spent a fair amount of time at conferences. Given that many conferences ask researchers to summarize their work in 15 to 20 minutes, we thought we’d reflect on some ideas for how to do this, and – more importantly – how to do it well.

What works for improving welfare in agriculture: version 0.001

Markus Goldstein's picture
Two years ago, Mike O’Sullivan and I did a post on gender and agriculture.  One of the things we pointed out was that there was a pretty dismal lack of evidence on interventions in agriculture (forget gender).  So I was pretty excited when the recent Campbell Collaboration systematic review on “the effects of training, innovation and new technology on African smallholder farmers’ economic outcomes and food

A spatial odyssey: The impacts of land formalization in Benin

Markus Goldstein's picture
This post is co-authored with Michael O’Sullivan.  
Effective property rights matter for development. And heck, they even got a couple of shout outs in the recently adopted Sustainable Development Goals.  And we know from earlier work that weaker rights can lead to reduced agricultural productivity.  So what happens when folks move to better property rights?  

Who in this household has the final say?

Markus Goldstein's picture
Who in the household has decision making power over various things (kids going to school, health seeking behavior of individual members) either alone or jointly with someone else in the household makes up a set of questions that often find their way into surveys (e.g. a version is included in most Demographic and Health Surveys).  An interesting new paper by Amber Peterman and coauthors takes a hard look at these questions and what they might, or might not, be telling us.    

Notes from the field: October edition

Markus Goldstein's picture
In our continued series on experiences in implementing impact evaluations in the field, here are a couple of observations from my recent experiences in the field on some enterprise related impact evaluations I am working on:
  • The case of the fired up implementers.One of the evaluations we are working on is comparing two different types of business training – with both being delivered by the same service providers.Apparently the training of the trainers worked too well; in at least one location the trainers were so entrepreneurially energized by the training that they developed their own hybrid model that combines the two (yes, there already was a third arm where folks get both).This reminded me the importance of always knowing (at multiple points in time), as best you can, what is actually being implemented.

The infinite loop failure of replication in economics

Markus Goldstein's picture
In case you missed it, there was quite a brouhaha about worms and the replication of one particular set of results this summer (see Dave's anthology here).   I am definitely not going to wade into that debate, but there is a recent paper by Andrew Chang and Phillip Li which gives us one take on the larger issue involved:  the replication of published results.   Their conclusion is nicely captured in t

Pages