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Markus Goldstein's blog

If you build it, they will come. Especially girls.

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Enrollment in rural Afghanistan, as you might suspect, is fairly low. And, while the primary enrollment gap between boys and girls has closed in most parts of the world, it’s alive and well here (as well as in some parts of Africa). But an interesting paper by Dana Burde and Leigh Linden gives us hope. (Gated version here and earlier ungated version here)

Robin Hood and bureaucratic malfeasance

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Driving home in my beat-up Honda last week, I listened to an interesting story on NPR on why good people do bad things.   One particularly interesting paper being discussed was by Francesca Gino and Lamar Pierce on how those folks who test your car emissions may be favoring folks who are more like them – malfeasance but with a

Is our columnists learning?

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In a New York Times column last Friday David Brooks discussed a book by Jim Manzi, and extolled the idea of randomized field trials as a way for the US to make better policies. 

While it’s nice to welcome Citizen Brooks into the fold, there are a couple of points in his article worth exploring a bit.  

Evaluate before you leap -- volunteers needed!

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It’s been a year since we started the Development Impact blog, and I thought I would use the one year anniversary to focus on one of the classic papers in impact evaluation.    This paper (gated version here, ungated version here) is by Gordon Smith and Jill Pell and appeared in the BMJ back in 2003.

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