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intra-household allocation

Do conditional cash transfers empower women?

Markus Goldstein's picture
A couple of weeks ago, I blogged about a new approach to measuring within household decision making.   Continuing in that vein, I was recently reading a paper (ungated version here) by Almas, Armand, Attanasio, and Carneiro which offers a really ne

Unpacking within household interactions: the roles people take

Markus Goldstein's picture
Some of us often try to understand how households may be functioning by using intrahousehold decision making questions.   For example, the multi country Demographic and Health Surveys often ask who makes decisions on large household purchase: the male, the female or the two together.    The idea is that this kind of question helps us understand power dynamics.   And there is a fair bit of correlational work that suggests this makes sense.  
 

Who in this household has the final say?

Markus Goldstein's picture
Who in the household has decision making power over various things (kids going to school, health seeking behavior of individual members) either alone or jointly with someone else in the household makes up a set of questions that often find their way into surveys (e.g. a version is included in most Demographic and Health Surveys).  An interesting new paper by Amber Peterman and coauthors takes a hard look at these questions and what they might, or might not, be telling us.    

Love and secrets

Markus Goldstein's picture

OK, let’s put two blog posts in a pot and stir.   In a previous post on measuring consumption, Jed gave us some food for thought, while over on Aid Thoughts, Matt is talking about how a respondent is seeing the enumerator on the sly to conceal land that he doesn’t want his wife to know about.   Put it together, and what do you have?