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policy experiments

Helping new immigrants find work: a policy experiment in Sweden

David McKenzie's picture

Despite the large and growing literatures on migration in economics, sociology, and other social sciences, there is surprisingly little work which actually evaluates the impact of particular migration policies (most of the literature concerns the determinants of migrating, and the consequences of doing so for the migrants, their families, and for native workers). I am therefore always interested to see new work in this area, particularly work which manages to obtain experimental variation in policy implementation.

An underappreciated benefit of experiments: convincing politicians when their pet projects don’t work

David McKenzie's picture

New York City has suspended payments in a pay-for-performance program for teachers after an experiment found the program had not worked. From the New York Post:

Another attempt by the city to improve student performance through cash payments has failed, much to the surprise of Mayor Bloomberg.

The new big randomized trial that you should know about – randomized Medicaid

David McKenzie's picture

Given the massive debate in the U.S. about government health insurance, the just released results of a new experiment are justly making headlines. In 2004, the state of Oregon, due to budgetary shortfalls, closed its public health insurance program for low-income people. In early 2008, the state decided it had enough budget to fund 10,000 new spots. Given that it expected demand for these new slots to far exceed supply, the state Government opened up a sign-up window, getting 90,000 people to sign-up for a waitlist, and then used random lottery draws to select people from the waitlist.