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Sex, Lies, and Measurement: Do Indirect Response Survey Methods Work? (No…)

Berk Ozler's picture

Smart people, mainly with good reason, like to make statements like “Measure what is important, don’t make important what you can measure,” or “Measure what we treasure and not treasure what we measure.” It is rumored that even Einstein weighed in on this by saying: “Not everything that can be counted counts and not everything that counts can be counted.” A variant of this has also become a rallying cry among those who are “anti-randomista,” to agitate against focusing research only on questions that one can answer experimentally.

However, I am confident that all researchers can generally agree that there is not much worse than the helpless feeling of not being able to vouch for the veracity of what you measured. We can deal with papers reporting null results, we can deal with messy or confusing stories, but what gives no satisfaction to anyone is to present some findings and then having to say: “This could all be wrong, because we’re not sure the respondents in our surveys are telling the truth.” This does not mean that research on sensitive topics does not get done, but like the proverbial sausage, it is necessary to block out where the data came from and how it was made.