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Education

We know socio-emotional skills are important – How do we develop them? A review of Paul Tough’s Helping Children Succeed

David Evans's picture
In 2012, Paul Tough published How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character, in which he highlighted how children who develop “noncognitive capacities” like self-control and perseverance do much better in adulthood.

Starting life off on the wrong foot

Markus Goldstein's picture
I was recently at the GW conference on the economics & political economy of Africa where I saw an interesting paper by Richard Akresh, Emilie Bagby, Damien de Walque, and Harounan Kazianga on Burkina Faso.    Akresh and co. make another compelling argument for focusing on early childhood (and indeed, in utero).   Kids whose household has a shock during this critical period are less smart – and this leads to them going to school less. 

What are Schools Worth? That Depends on the General Equilibrium Effects - Guest post by Gaurav Khanna

Large-scale educational expansions represent substantial investments of public resources and benefit households by increasing education levels, and therefore productivity in the local economy. However, since they impact both individual behavior and labor markets, convincing causal estimates of their overall benefits are hard to generate.

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