Syndicate content

Urban Development

Get more farmers off their farms

David McKenzie's picture
Justin Wolfers had a nice piece in the Upshot about new work on how growing up in a bad neighborhood has long-term negative consequences for kids. The key point of the new work is that the benefits of moving from bad neighborhoods may be particularly high for kids whose parents won’t voluntarily move, but only move because their public housing is demolished.

Taking the Bus to Opportunity: Guest post by David Phillips

In the 1960s, black and white individuals in the United States had radically different labor market outcomes. In 1962, the unemployment rate for African-Americans was 13 percent while it was only 6 percent for whites. Fifty years have passed, enough time for Martin Luther King to go from movement leader to monument, but as of 2010, the unemployment rate in the U.S.