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A rant on the external validity double double-standard

David McKenzie's picture

Concerns about external validity are a common critique of micro work in development, especially experimental work. While not denying that it is useful to learn what works in a variety of different settings, there seems to be two forms of double-standard (or a double double-standard) going on: first, economic journals and economists in general seem to apply it to work on developing countries more than they do to other forms of research; and second, this concern seems to be expressed about experiments more than other micro work in development.  

Measuring consumption (through survey)

Jed Friedman's picture

Markus’ s post yesterday is the first on what will be one recurring blog theme here- measurement. I’ll continue the trend today with a focus on one of the most fundamental welfare constructs in economics: consumption. Specifically, how might the development researcher accurately measure household consumption through survey?

Measuring secrets

Markus Goldstein's picture

One of the things I learned in my first field work experience was that keeping interviews private was critical if you wanted unbiased information.   Why? I guess at the time it should have been kind of obvious to me – there are certain questions that a person will answer differently depending on whom else is in the room. We were doing a socio-economic survey of rural households in Ghana, and we thought that income, in particular, would be sensitive, since spouses tended to share information on this selectively and perhaps in a strategic way.  

Build a casino to help understand the consequences of poverty

Jed Friedman's picture

As a PhD student in the late 90s, randomized field trials were not yet common place in empirical development economics. Certain quasi-experimental methods such as regression discontinuity were also fairly exotic. It was the era of the “natural experiment”, when fellow PhD students scoured county newspapers at the university library for research leads. These students were looking for news of policy changes that might plausibly introduce some exogenous variation in the local market environment.

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