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Friday links September 6, 2013: Cash, Scarcity, Justice, Taking your Kids to work (Development edition), and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Biking to more education in India

Markus Goldstein's picture
"Let me tell you what I think of bicycling. I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. I rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel. It gives her a feeling of self-reliance and independence the moment she takes her seat; and away she goes – the picture of untrammeled womanhood." - Susan B Anthony
 

How should we understand “clinical equipoise” when doing RCTs in development

David McKenzie's picture
While the blog was on break over the last month, a couple of posts caught my attention by discussing whether it is ethical to do experiments on programs that we think we know will make people better off. First up, Paul Farmer on the Lancet Global Health blog writes:
 

The International Rescue Committee's approach to impact evaluation

Markus Goldstein's picture
Our series on institutional approaches to impact evaluation continues!    DI recently virtually sat down with Jeannie Annan, Director of Research and Evaluation at the International Rescue Committee.   
 
DI:  What is the overall approach to impact evaluation at the IRC?
JA:  We are committed to providing (or supporting) the most effective and cost-effective interventions. This means using the best available research about what works combined with understanding of the context and experience in implementation to design and deliver our programs.  

Creativity vs. fishing for results in scientific research

Berk Ozler's picture
One of my favorite bloggers, Andrew Gelman, has a piece in Slate.com in which he uses a psychology paper that purported to show women are more likely to wear red or pink when they are most fertile as an example of the ‘scientific mass production of spurious statistical significance.’ Here is an excerpt:

The MCC's approach to impact Evaluation

Markus Goldstein's picture
In our continuing series on discussing institutional approaches to impact evaluation, DI virtually sat down with Jack Molyneaux, Director of Independent Evaluations at the Millennium Challenge Corporation.  (Please note that these are Jack’s opinions, not that of the MCC)
 
DI:  Impact Evaluation seems to be something that's pretty important at the MCC. Can you tell us a bit about how this focus came about? 
JM: Since its inception MCC’s mandate has included demonstrating results.  Rigorous impact evaluations have always been a key component of that mandate. 

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