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Increasing Prosperity for the Poorest using Social Networks: Guest post by Kathryn Vasilaky

Social networks affect all of our lives; the people we know influence what we're exposed to and the actions we take. Gaining weight? Blame your network. Got a job promotion? Thank your network. In the developed world, the term "social networks" often illicits thoughts of Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Instagram and many, many more. In the rural developing world, networks still depend, for the most part, on offline interactions. Access to information is by word of mouth, and a few central individuals often disseminate information from the top down to the remainder of a village.

Allocating Treatment and Control with Multiple Applications per Applicant and Ranked Choices

David McKenzie's picture
This came up in the context of work with Ganesh Seshan designing an evaluation for a computer training program for migrants. The training program was to be taught in one 3 hour class per week for several months. Classes were taught Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 5-8 pm, and then there were four separate slots on Friday, the first day of the weekend. So in total there were 7 possible sessions people could potentially attend. However, most migrants would prefer to go on the weekend, and many would not be able to attend on particular days of the week.

Weekly links: preventing coups through free trade?, why don’t Indians eat more? And more…

David McKenzie's picture

Power calculations: what software should I use?

Berk Ozler's picture

In my experimental work, I almost always do cluster-randomized field experiments (CRTs – T for trials), and therefore I always used the Optimal Design software (OD for short), which is freely available and fairly easy to use with menu based dialogue boxes, graphs, etc. However, preparing some materials for a course with a couple of colleagues, I came to realize that it has some strange basic limitations. That led me to invest some time into finding out about my alternatives in Stata. I thought I’d share a couple of things I learned here.

Weekly links June 26: hurting power, banning bottled water, the case against training, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Do More Hours Equal More Learning? Probably, But It Isn't Cheap

David Evans's picture
In many countries around the world, universal primary school enrollment has been achieved. But quality remains an ongoing challenge. How do you get students to learn more? One solution that comes up often in Latin America and the Caribbean is to increase the length of the school day. From Mais Educação in Brazil to Jornada Escolar Completa in Chile, many governments are considering or are already rolling out additional hours to the school day.

Will more hours help?

Another reason to prefer Ancova: dealing with changes in measurement between baseline and follow-up

David McKenzie's picture
A few months ago, Berk blogged about my paper on the case for more T, and in particular, on the point that Ancova estimation can deliver a lot more power than difference-in-differences when outcomes are not strongly autocorrelated.