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The Regressive Demands of Demand-Driven Development

Berk Ozler's picture

There is a frustratingly weak and positive finding in the literature that examines the targeting performance of social funds projects, which, over time, took on many of the characteristics of community-driven development programs and became an important part of the social protection strategy in many countries by funding projects that provide public (and sometimes private) goods requested by communities: they are only moderately pro-poor.

Tools of the Trade: Getting those standard errors correct in small sample cluster studies

Jed Friedman's picture

Some of the earliest posts on this blog concerned the inferential challenges of cluster randomized trials when clusters are few in number (see here and here for two examples of discussion). Today’s post continues this theme with a focus on better practice in the treatment of standard errors.

Blog your job market paper, an SME conference, randomizing fear, and more...

David McKenzie's picture

Blog your job market paper? We would love to have readers who are on the job market (as well as those who aren’t but have exciting work to share) do a guest post on their work. If your paper is about impact evaluation, or has a strong measurement component, or otherwise fits with the themes of the blog, we’d love to consider it for a guest post. We propose the following process:

Family Planning Whack-a-Mole

Berk Ozler's picture

Since I reviewed, back in April, the paper by Ashraf, Field, and Lee on the effect of providing vouchers for injectable contraceptives to women in reducing unwanted pregnancies in Lusaka, Zambia, I had been worrying about the use of these modern, convenient, and reliable technologies in those parts of the world in which HIV is highly prevalent.

Pooling risk, saving for health, looking inside the body: what mobile phones may soon allow us to do everywhere

Jed Friedman's picture

On my return from a long work trip in Thailand and the Philippines, I stopped at the University of Southern California to attend the 4th global health supply chain summit. I typically enjoy attending meetings outside my immediate discipline since I get to hear about new ideas in fields far from my own. This conference was no exception.

Democracy isn't dead

Markus Goldstein's picture

At least not in Benin.   This week, I take a look at interesting paper by Leonard Wantchekon documenting an experiment he did in Benin with this year’s presidential election.   In this paper, Leonard compares the results from a deliberative sharing of a candidate’s platform in a local town hall against a one-way communication of the candidate (or his broker) with a big rally.  

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