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Links of the week: The impact of the global gag order, taking your husband’s name, zapping cash, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

·         The impact of George Bush cutting funding to all NGOs operating abroad that provide or counsel women on abortion was actually to increase abortion rates according to new research by Stanford researchers – the hypothesized channel is through a reduction in the availability of birth control.

Development impact calls for knowledgeable development practitioners

Martin Ravallion's picture

These days we talk a lot about how best to assess development impact through evaluative research. Sound data and methods are essential. Here there has been considerable progress over the last 20 years or so.

All that progress will come to nothing if it does not make those people actually doing development more knowledgeable about what they are doing.  This depends in part on whether the research that is done is useful and well disseminated. Here there has also been progress, though more work is needed.

Further thoughts on sharing results

Markus Goldstein's picture

I wanted to follow up on David’s post of yesterday on the issue of sharing results with respondents.   My initial reaction was that we kind of owe this to the respondents not least because they spent a lot of time answering our tedious questionnaires. But as David points out, it’s not quite that simple in cases where we expect to have ongoing work.  

The perfectionists versus the reductionists

Markus Goldstein's picture

coauthored with Jishnu Das

Women perform 66 percent of the world’s work, and produce 50 percent of the food, yet earn only 10 percent of the income…. 

--Former President Bill Clinton addressing the annual meeting of the Clinton Global Initiative (September 2009)

Impressive, heart-wrenching, charity-inducing, get off your sofa and go do something heartbreaking.

But Wrong.

Guest post by Alice Wuermli: Learning from Others -The Potential Benefits of Interdisciplinary Collaboration

Studies of poverty, inequality, and development tend to be conducted in disciplinary silos. Rarely do such efforts reach across disciplinary boundaries and thus at times they fall short of grasping the complexity of these issues. Various scholars have made a case for interdisciplinary approaches particularly in the field of international development.

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