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Evaluating energy projects – a light-bulb moment?

Arianna Legovini's picture
I recently stumbled upon a TED talk given by Alex Laskey, the founder of Opower, a company using data to affect the behavior of energy consumers. The gist of his talk is that a small behavioral change can have large effects on overall consumption. It reminded me of the debate in impact evaluation (IE) and whether IE asks central or peripheral questions. In the case of energy, very little evidence exists regarding the impact of energy on the environment and the economy.

Do impact evaluations tell us anything about reducing poverty?

Markus Goldstein's picture
I recently was thinking about what impact evaluations in development can tell us about poverty reduction.  On one level this is a ridiculous question.  Most of the impact evaluations out there are designed to look at interventions to improve people's lives and the work is done in developing countries, so it follows that we are making poor people's lives better, right?   That's less obvious.  
 

Experimentally testing a Job Matching Service and explaining high educated unemployment in Jordan

David McKenzie's picture
In 2010, unemployment rates for Jordanian men and women between the ages of 22 to 26 with a post-secondary degree were 19 percent and 47 percent, respectively. The transition period from graduating university to stable employment for youth who do not immediately find a job is 33 months on average. This problem of educated unemployed is pervasive in many countries in MENA, and raises the question of why the labor market doesn’t clear for educated youth?

Where the Rubber Meets the Road: Impact Evaluation in Transport

Arianna Legovini's picture
I was recently invited to speak at the biannual infrastructure retreat of the IADB and was excited to learn that they had decided to devote two days of their retreat to discussing the development of an impact evaluation (IE) program in the transport sector. This is largest sector in most development banks, yet one that has not caught the IE bug. Perhaps this is because there is a perception that IE is difficult or impossible to incorporate into transportation projects.

The strange case of missing textbook impacts

Shwetlena Sabarwal's picture
Public programs are designed on assumptions - nice, tidy, convenient assumptions. Then they hit the real world and very little goes as planned. The culprit, some philosophically inclined would argue, is human behavior. After all, human beings are impossible to predict. They can react in ways entirely unexpected and fairly baffling …

… until you dig deeper.

Notes from the field: The danger of programs that pay for performance

Markus Goldstein's picture
I was recently working with an implementing agency to design an impact evaluation and we were having trouble reaching a point where there was going to be a viable impact evaluation that answered big questions about the efficacy of the intervention.   Looking back, part of the problem was that this agency was the implementer, not the funder.   And they were paid by the funder based on reaching a certain number of people and having those people participate in the program.
 

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