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Keeping it “real” in real-time evaluations: Guest post by Florence Kondylis and Maria Jones

Carrying out evaluations to affect policy is the big motivation of many development economists. Usually, grant proposals and such will ask researchers to document “How will your results affect policy?”. In this post, we address a corollary of that problem statement: “when and how should your results affect policy?”. All the work that goes into the evaluation design at the start drums up a lot of enthusiasm among policymakers, and may open windows of opportunity for policy influence long before the final results from the evaluation are available.

Surveying in countries with too many zeros in their currency

David McKenzie's picture
I’m working on an impact evaluation in Colombia right now, and we are in the process of looking at baseline data from firms. The data are a bit noisy at the moment, and part of what makes it hard for me to look at is that many of the costs are in the millions (e.g. an energy bill of 1,442,990). The exchange rate currently is 1USD = 2055 Colombian pesos.

Weekly links February 28: Malaria not so bad after all, people don’t mind if you only give stuff to their neighbors, and more…

David McKenzie's picture
  • Reminder: Today (Friday 28th) is the deadline for submissions to the World Bank’s ABCDE conference. While the title of the conference is “The Role of Theory in Development Economics”, they are looking for a broad range of “papers on innovative ways that analytical and deductive methods, as well as issues of methodology such as the use of randomizations, can be used in development.”.

Rethinking the household: the impacts of transfers

Markus Goldstein's picture
Two weeks ago, I blogged about some productive impacts of cash transfer programs.   For these effects, as well as the myriad other blog posts and papers on this topic out there, a key point is that the benefits of these transfers extend well beyond the actual individual recipient of the transfer.   
 

Yikes, not only is it hard for us to do experiments with firms, it can be really hard for firms to experiment on themselves

David McKenzie's picture
I came across a new working paper written by researchers at Google and Microsoft with the title “on the near impossibility of measuring the returns to advertising”. They begin by noting the astounding statistic that annual US advertising revenue is $173 billion, or about $500 per American per year. That’s right, more than the GDP per capita of countries like Burundi, Madagascar and Eritrea is spent just on advertising!

A Curated List of Our Postings on Technical Topics – Your One-Stop Shop for Methodology

David McKenzie's picture
Rather than the usual list of Friday links, this week I thought I’d follow up on our post by Guido Imbens yesterday on clustering and post earlier this week by Dave Evans on Hawthorne effects with a curated list of our technical postings, to serve as a one-stop shop for your technical reading.

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