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A Technology Letdown: Efforts at using RFID technology to track microenterprise inventories

David McKenzie's picture
Measuring microenterprise profits is hard. Most owners of these small firms keep no records and have very volatile incomes.  Asking firm owners what their profits are can lead to high refusal rates, noisy data, trouble with recall, and then there is the added concern that reporting may change with interventions  (either because an intervention like business training changes recording, or because people who get given finance may want you to think it has benefited them).

Guest Post by Sebastian Galiani: Replication in Social Sciences: Generalization of Cause-and-Effect Constructs

I agree with the general point raised by Berk in his previous post in this blog (read it here). We need to discuss when and how to conduct scientific replication of existing research in social sciences. I also agree with him that, at least in economics, pure replication analysis –which in my view it is the only genuine replication analysis- is of secondary interest –I hope to return to this issue in a future contribution in this blog. Instead, I believe that we should emphasize replication of relevant and internally valid studies both in similar and different environments. There is now excessive confidence in the knowledge gathered by a single study in a particular environment, perhaps as a result of a misconstruction of the virtues of experimentation in social sciences. As Donald T. Campbell once wrote (1969):

It’s Time Again for Submissions for our Annual Blog Your Job Market Paper Series

David McKenzie's picture

We are pleased to launch for the fourth year a call for PhD students on the job market to blog their job market paper on the Development Impact blog.  We welcome blog posts on anything related to empirical development work, impact evaluation, or measurement. For examples, you can see posts from 2013 and 2012. We will follow the same process as previous years, which is as follows:
We will start accepting submissions immediately, with the goal of publishing them in November and early December when people are deciding who to interview. Below are the rules that you must follow, followed by some guidance/tips you should follow:
 

Saving your way to a better state

Markus Goldstein's picture
People in developing countries, much like people everywhere, save.   And in Sub-Saharan Africa, beyond banks, folks save through a bunch of techniques -- ranging from the less sophisticated under the mattress savings to the more complex community-based rotating savings and credit associations (ROSCAs).    Given this plethora of savings options, one might wonder if an NGO program that set up savings groups but injected no capital or lockboxes or any other capital intensive intervention might make a

Testing different behavioral approaches to get people to attend business training

David McKenzie's picture

A while back I blogged about work using active choice and enhanced active choice to get people to get flu shots and prescription refills. The basic idea here is that relatively small modifications to the way a choice is presented can have large impacts on the take-up of a program. This seemed useful in the context of many of our training programs– attendance rates averaged 65 percent in a review of business training programs I did with Chris Woodruff. Therefore for an ongoing evaluation of the GET AHEAD business training program in Kenya, we decided to test out this approach.
 

Weekly links October 17: how to do organizational change, extortion and schooling, what’s new in microfinance evidence, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Quantifying the Hawthorne Effect

Jed Friedman's picture
This post is co-authored with Brinda Gokul
 
Many who work on impact evaluation are familiar with the concept of the Hawthorne effect and its potential risk to the accurate inference of causal impact. But if this is a new concept, let’s quickly review the definition and history of the Hawthorne effect:
 

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