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Can monitoring teachers and students – with no incentive or punishment attached -- improve test scores? Yes.

David Evans's picture
Consider two challenges in global education development:
  1. Effective adult education is difficult to accomplish all over the world.
  2. Quality of education is a problem across many countries in Africa at all levels (primary, secondary, tertiary, adult).

Do More Hours Equal More Learning? Probably, But It Isn't Cheap

David Evans's picture
In many countries around the world, universal primary school enrollment has been achieved. But quality remains an ongoing challenge. How do you get students to learn more? One solution that comes up often in Latin America and the Caribbean is to increase the length of the school day. From Mais Educação in Brazil to Jornada Escolar Completa in Chile, many governments are considering or are already rolling out additional hours to the school day.

Will more hours help?

227 studies later, what actually works to improve learning in developing countries?

David Evans's picture
Yesterday we talked about some of the limitations in systematic reviews of educational research, and how many of the reviews have – on the face of them – varying recommendations. The main recommendations as to what works (principally drawn from the abstracts and introductions) are in the figure below.

How standard is a standard deviation? A cautionary note on using SDs to compare across impact evaluations in education

Guest post by Abhijeet Singh
Last week on this blog, David wondered whether we should give up on using SDs for comparing effect sizes across impact evaluations. I wish that question was asked more often in the field of impact evaluations in education, where such comparisons are most rife. In this post, I explore some of the reasons why such comparisons might be flawed and what we might do to move towards less fragile metrics.