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  • Reply to: The State of Development Journals 2017: Quality, Acceptance Rates, and Review Times   7 hours 28 min ago
    Two more comments received from journal editors by email, which I'm recording here, in part so that if I or someone does a follow-up round next year, all comments are in one place:
    1) A couple of journals noted they had experienced a large increase in submissions over the past 5 years or so, with many of these coming from developing country scholars. There was anecdotal evidence that many of these were desk rejects, and so if these were excluded, acceptance rates may look higher. So in a future edition, might be worth seeing if there is a breakdown by country of submission, and if there are any acceptance rates etc. by this breakdown.
    2) Similarly they wondered how the presence or absence of submission fees affected the number of submissions, especially from developing countries. I don't think any of the development journals charge these fees, but something to measure in the next iteration.
  • Reply to: The State of Development Journals 2017: Quality, Acceptance Rates, and Review Times   1 day 2 hours ago

    Excellent work David, thanks for the time you invested. You really collected key statistics. One journal I'd like to suggest for future consideration is Development Policy Review. It features lots of development economists' work.

  • Reply to: The State of Development Journals 2017: Quality, Acceptance Rates, and Review Times   4 days 5 hours ago

    Hi David, this is a wonderful piece! I really learnt much from this and your earlier pieces that interviewed journal editors. And I have a question. Given the different submission times, and the fact that not every one of our papers may have good chance at the top journals, and we have a limited number of papers to submit, do you have any thoughts on a good strategy for submission that minimizes waiting times but maximize outcomes for us young researchers? Say, if I have a paper that may only have a 15% chance of getting a R&R at the JDE or WBER (in my subjective opinion), should I still try it there? Or should I try the other journals? Should my decision change if this chance is larger or smaller?
    Thanks, and this is a very nice piece again.

  • Reply to: The State of Development Journals 2017: Quality, Acceptance Rates, and Review Times   4 days 6 hours ago

    Thanks David.very usefull. Review of income and wealth, social indicators research and journal of economic inequality could be journals to add.

  • Reply to: The State of Development Journals 2017: Quality, Acceptance Rates, and Review Times   4 days 9 hours ago

    Characteristics of a paper that suffers desk rejection would be useful