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October 2015

Weekly links October 30: how to decide on whether you have a zero effect, the impact of becoming a (swiss) citizen, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

It’s that time of the year (no, not Halloween): Submissions open for our annual "Blog Your Job Market Paper" series

Berk Ozler's picture

We are pleased to launch for the fifth year a call for PhD students and others on the job market to blog their job market paper on Development Impact.  We welcome blog posts on anything related to empirical development work, impact evaluation, or measurement. For examples, you can see posts from 20142013 and 2012. We will follow a slightly altered process from the previous years, with the main difference being a hard deadline for submissions rather than rolling submissions:

We will start accepting submissions immediately until midnight on Monday, November 23, with the goal of publishing a couple before Thanksgiving and then about 6-8 more in December when people are deciding who to interview. We will not accept any submissions after the deadline. We will also do some more refereeing this year, which might imply a slightly lower success rate than previous years (but still better than 50%). Below are the rules that you must follow, followed by some guidance/tips you should follow:
 

Weekly links October 23: popularizing research, partial identification, celebrating ideas-led growth, and more…

David McKenzie's picture

Notes from the field: October edition

Markus Goldstein's picture
In our continued series on experiences in implementing impact evaluations in the field, here are a couple of observations from my recent experiences in the field on some enterprise related impact evaluations I am working on:
  • The case of the fired up implementers.One of the evaluations we are working on is comparing two different types of business training – with both being delivered by the same service providers.Apparently the training of the trainers worked too well; in at least one location the trainers were so entrepreneurially energized by the training that they developed their own hybrid model that combines the two (yes, there already was a third arm where folks get both).This reminded me the importance of always knowing (at multiple points in time), as best you can, what is actually being implemented.

Exporting on eBay: The Impact of Lowering the Hassle Costs of Exporting

David McKenzie's picture
Getting more firms to export is a policy goal in many countries around the world. However, the trade literature has not had very many well-identified evaluations of policy interventions that facilitate exports (a notable exception being work by Atkin et al in Egypt). So I thought it would be useful to share the results of a recent experiment by Xiang Hui making it easier for sellers to export on eBay.

The infinite loop failure of replication in economics

Markus Goldstein's picture
In case you missed it, there was quite a brouhaha about worms and the replication of one particular set of results this summer (see Dave's anthology here).   I am definitely not going to wade into that debate, but there is a recent paper by Andrew Chang and Phillip Li which gives us one take on the larger issue involved:  the replication of published results.   Their conclusion is nicely captured in t