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Social Media at the World Bank: Opening up the Spring Meetings With Live Interviews, Your Questions

Jim Rosenberg's picture

5 Questions in 5 Minutes

The twists and turns of the global economy have been the focus of conversations in board rooms, backyards and everything in between since 2008. A new dialogue has emerged about the future – including how to protect the very poorest, create economic opportunity and ensure equality. Amid this, the upcoming Spring Meetings will convene a conversation on several of these themes, including social safety nets, job growth, access to finance and gender equality.


Social media on mobile phones: the future is cloudly, fast and applicable

Jim Rosenberg's picture

This week I’m at the Mobile World Congress, the annual jamboree for some 50,000 people from 200 countries whose livelihoods are focused on the device you probably wake up with, carry everywhere with you, and are more likely to miss than even your misplaced or stolen credit card: your mobile phone. I’m here because more than half of social media activity globally happens via mobile handsets and because if people from Mashable, Twitter, FourSquare and Google are turning up at the same place at the same time, it’s probably worth checking out. 2011 is signaling the full-on dominance of mobile web, internet, and social media in the mobile space.

There’s much to be in awe of here. In just the past 48 hours I’ve played with the 3-D handset on offer from LG, and seen a friend based in Nairobi brandish a $50 Huawei smartphone with Google’s operating system, Android (note that in the U.S., the typical Android handset costs north of $500 without subsidy from a mobile operator).  And for the two billion or so people globally who probably can’t afford even a $50 handset, there was welcome news Monday when a firm called Gemalto announced that it had crafted what I’d call a poor man’s version of Facebook, housed on a SIM card and using SMS to send and receive data between handsets and Facebook servers. This means Facebook, which already reaches 600 million people, will potentially be available to almost anyone on the planet with a mobile device.

Preliminary thoughts from Web 2.0 Summit

Sameer Vasta's picture

I've been here in San Francisco for the past few days, and when I haven't been stuffing my face with burritos and Blue Bottle coffee, I've been spending time at the Web 2.0 Summit.

I'll jot down some more coherent and cohesive thoughts about the Summit during my red-eye back to DC later tonight, but for now, I wanted to share a few presentations, issues, and ideas that have jumped out at me during the session so far.

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