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Sri Lanka

Partnering to measure impacts of private sector projects on job creation

Alvaro Gonzalez's picture
Worker in Ghana
For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational.  
Photo: Jonathan Ernst / World Bank

Jobs are what we earn, what we do, and sometimes even who we are. For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational. Good jobs add value to society, taking into account the benefits they have on the people who hold them, and the potential spillover effects on others. For example, inclusive jobs, such as those that employ women, can change the way families spend money and invest in the education and health of children.  

Creating employment in post-conflict and fragile states

Nisha Arunatilake's picture

Violent conflicts, such as the one experienced by Sri Lanka, are caused by a variety of factors. Even when violent conflicts are concluded, the societies remain fragile. Fragility affects the demand for labour because firms and businesses are reluctant to invest. The poor quality of governance in affected areas further discourages private firms. But the Eastern Revival programme undertaken in Sri Lanka post 2007, enabled the fishing industry to rebound quickly. We look at how this was achieved. 

If Sri Lanka is to join the knowledge economy, it needs to improve its education, training and skills

Nisha Arunatilake's picture
With innovation taking a central role in driving markets, countries are increasingly looking to invest in innovation and technological change to be competitive and improve productivity. Innovation is driven by talent and creativity. But the demand for highly skilled workers, especially workers in the science and technology fields are increasing globally.

Business training for small enterprises in developing countries: does it work?

Suresh de Mel's picture
What helps small businesses grow? In January 2009, two colleagues (David McKenzie and Chris Woodruff) and I began an experiment that examined the effects of general business training on current and potential female small business owners in urban Sri Lanka.We found that small business training helps potential owners to open businesses more quickly and helps to improve their business outcomes. But generating re-investable profit growth in subsistence-level female-run businesses remains a challenging task.