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Latin America & Caribbean

Four policy approaches to support job creation through Global Value Chains

Ruchira Kumar's picture
 Maria Fleischmann / World Bank

Mexico created over 60,000 jobs between 1993 to 2000 upgrading the apparel value chain from assembly to direct distribution to customers.  (Photo: Maria Fleischmann / World Bank)

As we discussed in our previous post, Global Value Chains can lead to the creation of more, inclusive and better jobs. GVCs can be a win-win for firms that create better jobs while they enjoy greater efficiency, productivity, and profits. However, there is a potential trade-off between increasing competitiveness and job creation, and the exact nature of positive labor market outcomes depends on several parameters. Given the cross-border (and, therefore, multiple jurisdictive) nature of GVCs, national policy choices to strengthen positive labor outcomes are limited. However, national governments can make policy decisions to facilitate GVC participation that is commensurate with positive labor market outcomes.

Three lessons to boost job creation through productive alliances in the food system

Ethel Sennhauser's picture
 
The job creation challenge is intensifying. And the next generation of productive alliances must tap its potential more proactively. What are the best ways to optimize this approach towards boosting employment?
The job creation challenge is intensifying. And the next generation of productive alliances must tap its potential more proactively. What are the best ways to optimize this approach towards boosting employment? (Photo: Chhor Sokunthea / World Bank)


The food system currently employs the majority of people in developing countries, both in self and wage employment. And, according to our recent paper on jobs, all signs indicate that this system — which includes agriculture, as well as beyond-farm jobs in food processing, transportation, restaurants and others — will continue to be a major engine for job creation in the foreseeable future. As economies all over the world are confronted with the challenge of creating around 1.6 billion jobs over the next 15 years, it is important to harness the potential for job generation through productive alliances.

Partnering to measure impacts of private sector projects on job creation

Alvaro Gonzalez's picture
Worker in Ghana
For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational.  
Photo: Jonathan Ernst / World Bank

Jobs are what we earn, what we do, and sometimes even who we are. For the poor and vulnerable of the world, jobs are key to ending poverty and driving development. But not all jobs are equally transformational. Good jobs add value to society, taking into account the benefits they have on the people who hold them, and the potential spillover effects on others. For example, inclusive jobs, such as those that employ women, can change the way families spend money and invest in the education and health of children.  

Government and jobs: a new consensus

David Robalino's picture
Targeted regional and sectoral policies can be game changers in job creation.  Photo: Network on Jobs and Development

We recently hosted our first Jobs and Development Conference, and one of the key topics we discussed was the role of governments in creating jobs. We had about 260 participants, and 68 papers were presented (more than 150 considered but not selected for presentation, a high rejection rate that attests to the quality of the papers that were presented).

One of the plenary sessions that I chaired focused on the role of governments in designing and implementing jobs strategies. The consensus has been that jobs will come if countries just fix markets and institutions to promote investment and economic growth. But this is a very simplistic view.

A Peruvian jobs diagnostic

Elizabeth Ruppert Bulmer's picture
Infographic: high resolution
Last week the World Bank Group’s Annual Meetings was held in Lima, Peru. The country has enjoyed more than a decade of strong economic growth. But what has this meant for the Peruvian labor market? The World Bank’s Jobs Group has used its Jobs Diagnostic tool to analyze the country to better understand how workers in Peru are enabling and benefiting from economic growth, and productivity challenges for the future.  

Is higher education always a good investment?

Sergio Urzúa's picture

Higher education is more popular than ever in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC), where gross enrollment rates have risen dramatically , according to World Bank estimates. But are these higher education students getting their money’s worth in terms of better jobs and higher incomes? To investigate this, we carried out an empirical study of two countries: Columbia and Chile. Our findings suggest that investing in higher education isn’t always profitable.

Protestor carrying banner: "We demand quality education and they give us classes on line,"  Valparaiso, Chile, August 25, 2011. Photo: Flickr @ san_dia (Sandra Marín)

New insights for Entra21 in Cordoba

Guillermo Cruces's picture

The past decade has wrought numerous studies on youth training programs, especially in Latin America and the Caribbean. However, little research exists on they operate and their effects beyond the labor market. We spoke with Guillermo Cruces, of the Center for Distributive, Labor and Social Studies (CEDLAS) at the Universidad Nacional de La Plata, Argentina, about the Center's efforts to fill this hole by studying the Entra21 program in Cordoba in 2011-12.

Students in rural Argentina. Photo: Flickr@WorldBank (Nahuel Berger)

Chile’s School System Feeds Income Inequality

Sergio Urzúa's picture

In the 1980s, Chile's educational system underwent a major overhaul that included decentralizing administrative powers and the creation of a three-tiered school system. We spoke with Sergio Urzúa (University of Maryland) about a new study published by him, Dante Contreras (University of Chile), and Jorge Rodríguez (University of Chicago), which suggests that the three-tiered school system, along with other educational reforms, aren't helping to reduce income equality.

Would Better Job Conditions Boost Latin America’s Productivity?

Juan Chaparro's picture

Latin America is looking for ways to boost its low productivity. We spoke to Juan Chaparro (PhD student, Department of Applied Economics, University of Minnesota), about a new study by him and Eduardo Lora (former Chief Economist, Inter-American Development Bank), which suggests that the answer might lie in creating a better job environment. Chaparro tells the JKP that the results are quite encouraging.

Attracting Multinationals: How Costa Rica Fared

Laura Alfaro's picture

Why are some countries better able to attract multinationals than others? To learn more, the JKP looked at the case of Costa Rica, which has gained enourmous foreign investment since attracting Intel to invest in 1996. We asked Laura Alfaro – who was Costa Rica’s Minister of National Planning and Economic Policy (2010-2012) and is now at Harvard Business School – about the relative roles of the private and public sectors and what countries can do to attract multinationals.

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