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November 2017

Making violence prevention projects work in small, rural communities

Geordan Shannon's picture
Also available in: Español

Community leaders discuss systems of violence prevention in the community of San Juan de Floresta in Loreto, Peru. Photo credit: G Shannon, DB Peru

In the Peruvian Amazon, the Lower Napo River communities that we are working with for the upcoming GBV in the Amazon of Peru (GAP) Project are negotiating a transition to modernity, where increasing access to transport, telecommunication and media has meant that communal life is changing. This has coincided with increasing concerns about gender violence: recent figures from Mazan, a remote township on the Lower Napo River, show that 79% of women between the ages of 18 and 29 report experiencing sexual violence at some point in their life.

What connectivity means for Brazil’s youngest state

Martin Raiser's picture
Also available in: Portuguese

All photos by Gregoire Gauthier and Satoshi Ogita

Marcos Ribeiro almost has tears in his eyes, as he explains the huge opportunities he sees for modern, ecologically mindful agriculture to us, a visiting World Bank team. The young tropical fruit producer is standing in front of his small farm, some 15 km outside of Palmas, the capital of Tocantins, Brazil’s youngest state.

Wage Inequality in Latin America: Understanding the Past to Prepare for the Future

Joana Silva's picture
Also available in: Español | Portuguese



In the early 1800s, the Prussian scientist and explorer Alexander von Humboldt wandered the streets of Mexico City and Lima and wrote of his astonishment at the misery and wealth, the "nakedness" and the “luxury", the "immense inequality of fortune."  This image endures. The region, along with Sub-Saharan Africa, is the most unequal in the world today.

Fostering livable and prosperous cities: 4 steps that Peru should take

Zoe Elena Trohanis's picture
Also available in: Español
Vista del Metropolitano de noche. Lima. Perú.

When you think of Peru, the first city that usually comes to mind is Lima. Why? Well, because Lima is the largest city in the country, with close to 50% of the nation’s urban population living in the metropolitan area; the city also produces 45% of Peru’s GDP. While this level of concentration of population and economic activity may not be a good or bad thing, it points to some imbalances in the urban system in Peru.