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Bolivia’s National Research Program on Wheat: A success story of collaborative research

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: Español | Français

Wheat-Program-INIAF-Bolivia

“Don’t waste your time in local breeding programs if someone else can improve the seed for you. We are a small country and cannot afford to reinvent the wheel”. This was the pragmatic advice of a Bhutanese agro-scientist visiting Bolivia a few years ago. His statement might be true, especially in resource-limited countries. However, I strongly believe that implementing agricultural innovations requires bridging the global with the local in a two-way partnership, with strong capabilities in the field. Here's a good example.  

Ecuador: Recovering Hope

Indu John-Abraham's picture
Also available in: Español
 Paul Salazar / World Bank
The Park of La Merced, in Caraquez Bay, Ecuador, become a temporary shelter for dozens of families who have lost their homes. Photo: Paul Salazar / World Bank

From the moment the earthquake happened, I was anxious to go to the coastal areas that were most affected.  Possibly because of my past life working for a relief agency, where emergencies were an immediate call to action to help those who were, and are, facing so much loss – loss of family and friends, of homes, of livelihoods, of a sense of peace and security.  But also a sense of uncertainty to be faced with such loss –to look beyond the tragedy to find the hope.  While at the same time, managing the risks for my colleagues and myself of possibly facing another strong replica that might leave us among the disaster. 

So what can be done to contain volatility and spur growth in these countries?

Francisco G. Carneiro's picture
Understanding Macroeconomic Volatility: Part 5. Read parts 1-4 here

How does this affect the small island economies of the Caribbean?

Francisco G. Carneiro's picture
Understanding Macroeconomic Volatility: Part 4. Click to read the rest of the series

Latin America: Is There Hope for Prosperity After the Commodity Price Boom?

Katia Vostroknutova's picture

This blog was previously published in The World Post.

Talk about ‘growth’ in Latin America has become less upbeat today than a few years ago. That’s no surprise. For over a decade, average growth meant at least double the economic activity that we are seeing today. 

What’s the connection between financial development, volatility, and growth?

Francisco G. Carneiro's picture
Understanding macroeconomic volatility part 3
Read parts 1 & 2


There’s good evidence that a country’s level of financial development affects the impact of volatility on economic growth, particularly so in less developed countries, as the charts below demonstrate
 

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