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Can temporary employment help reduce crime?

Fabrizio Zarcone's picture
Also available in: Español

Activities of the Temporary Income Support Program, or PATI / World Bank

With collaboration of Emma Monsalve.

The 2008-09 financial crisis significantly affected El Salvador. The economy, as measured by gross domestic product, contracted 3.1 percent in 2009. The crisis seriously affected employment: between 2008 and 2009, more than 100,000 Salvadorans, or 3 percent of the labor force, became unemployed or under-employed.

Towards a culture of prevention: Disaster risk reduction begins at home!

Jorge Luis Alva-Luperdi's picture
Also available in: Español

As May 31st comes around yet again, I’m reminded of this date 48 years ago. The peaceful South American country of Peru was going about another normal day… until the clock struck 3:23 pm. Life changed in the blink of an eye, as an 8.0 magnitude earthquake hit the Peruvian regions of Ancash and La Libertad. It was an unimaginable catastrophe. 

The town of Yungay, in Ancash, was almost flattened in just 45 seconds — the earthquake smashed homes, schools, and public infrastructure. The shock of the quake destabilized glaciers on the mountain known as Huascaran, located 15 km east of Yungay, causing millions of cubic meters of rock, ice, and snow to come tearing down at high speeds towards Yungay. Within minutes, the city was buried, along with almost 25,000 of its residents, many of whom had run to church to pray after the earthquake.

This “Great Peruvian Earthquake” of 1970 is a landmark in the history of natural disasters. The overall toll was around 74,000 people dead; about 25,600 people declared missing; 43,000 injured; and many more were left homeless, including thousands of children. Only 350 people survived in Yungay — they had climbed to the town’s elevated cemetery, a curious case of the living seeking refuge among the dead. Elsewhere, a circus clown saved 300 children by taking them to a local stadium.

How to guarantee water access to reduce inequality in Central America

Seynabou Sakho's picture
Also available in: Español

Four years ago, Juan Angel Sandoval, a resident of Barrio Buenos Aires in the Honduran municipality of Siguatepeque, received water at home only three times a week. His was not an isolated reality. Most of his neighbors, were in the same situation. "It was annoying because the water was not enough," says Juan Angel.

As Peru’s agricultural production grows, smallholders long for better markets

David Dudenhoefer's picture
Also available in: Español
 CIP
Native potato varieties that were only consumed in the Andes are now served in Lima's best restaurants and exported as potato chips. Photo: CIP
Peruvian Agriculture has experienced impressive growth over the past two decades, which has contributed to the steady decline in the number of Peruvians living in poverty, yet millions of the country’s smallholders have missed out on that prosperity. A new book on Peru’s agricultural sector offers examples of more equitable approaches to agricultural development, to tap the sector’s full potential for alleviating poverty.

Social and economic inclusion of women is key for the development of Central America

Seynabou Sakho's picture
Also available in: Español

A couple of months ago, during one of my first visits to Central America as the World Bank Country Director, I had the opportunity of hearing the testimony of a young student from the municipality of San Dionisio, in the department of Matagalpa, Nicaragua. She said a small phrase with huge implications: "You know? In school I do not only learn, but here I feel part of a community.”

Without empowered women, there is no future for rural areas

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: Español
A beneficiary family from the commmunity of San José del Paredón (in Chuquisaca, Bolivia) celebrates the new irrigation system.
A beneficiary family from the commmunity of San José del Paredón in Bolivia celebrates the new irrigation system. Photo: Gabriela Orozco / World Bank. 

“When the company let us down, we only imposed a fine. We must be firm with companies and with vendors, otherwise they fail to fulfill their end. This is how to move the project forward”. This testimony impressed me a lot when I heard it from an indigenous woman in Bolivia, who was proud to be part of the steering committee and defend the interests of the community in the project.

 
Bolivia has a terrific success story to tell about encouraging rural women to take the lead in their communities and organizations and lift themselves and their families out of poverty.

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