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A monster attacked the Caribbean: time to rebuild thinking about the next one

Saurabh Dani's picture
Also available in: Español
 
 

 
“Hurricane Irma was so big that the entire eye of the storm covered all [160km2] of Barbuda.”
 
So starts the chilling story by a Red Cross volunteer who rode out the Cat 5 storm at home on this island, that has been all but obliterated. Hurricane Irma was the first storm in recorded history that sustained a Cat 5 status for over 3 days.

Looking at Colombia through the peace lens

Marcelo Jorge Fabre's picture
Also available in: Español



The International Day of Peace is celebrated on September 21st.  After more than 50 years of civil war, we finally have a national Peace Day to celebrate in Colombia, too.
 

In the Dominican Republic, Child Marriage Is Not Only a Moral Issue, But an Economic One as Well

Quentin Wodon's picture
Also available in: Español



In the Dominican Republic, more than one third of young women aged between 18 and 22 get married or form an informal union before turning 18, while one in five has already given birth before reaching that age. Child marriage is not only a moral issue; it also has economic impacts for the country.

Changes must come to the way agriculture is funded in Brazil

Diego Arias's picture
Also available in: Portuguese

A matching grant enabled the Brazilian cooperative Coopervoltapinho to build a rice silo. All photos by Romeu Scirea.

Imagine driving along a rural road and seeing many small farms, all growing flourishing crops. Would you know how the farmers obtained the funds to plant these crops, enhance their productivity, and deliver them to market?
 

Does Peru need more affordable housing?

Zoe Elena Trohanis's picture
Also available in: Español
Banco Mundial

If you didn’t have an opportunity to purchase a safe, well-constructed home in a good location, what would you do? Live with relatives? Rent an apartment? Or, build a home in a less desirable, or potentially vulnerable area prone to natural disasters where you may not have clear property ownership but with the hope that one day you will become the owner officially? These are the decisions many families face in Peru, a middle income country with the third highest housing deficit in Latin America.

What Does Being Efficient Mean? For Latin America, It Means Closing a Big Gap

Jorge Thompson Araujo's picture
Also available in: Español
Countries in Latin America and the Caribbean suffer from low productivity: the region’s workers produce on average just a fifth of the output of a US worker.

Productivity is the outcome of the functioning of an economy – both at the micro and macro levels. Therefore, we need to focus on the drivers of productivity if we want to shrink the efficiency gap.

What I Learned from Women Entrepreneurs in Oaxaca

Jorge Familiar's picture
Also available in: Español


I recently visited the small villages nestled in the mountains between Oaxaca and Veracruz to meet with women entrepreneurs running small forestry, toymaking, ecotourism and coffee businesses. I went to hear first hand their experiences starting businesses and taking on leadership roles in their communities. I also wanted to understand the challenges faced by them and generations of women to come.

Medellin: A model for cities worldwide

Pamela Sofia Duran Vinueza's picture



“Comuna 13 (one of the poorest areas in Medellin) has gone from being a marginalized community to being a resilient one. Many interventions that are being implemented for the youth and adults allow them to have a better life. All of this generates spaces where one can see that the transformation brings love, happiness, and liveliness, which all contribute to have a better future.” – Peter Alexander, Community Leader

If all you know about Medellín is its troubled past, you’re in for a surprise. Medellin has been known as a violent city not only in Latin America but throughout the world. During the 1980s and 1990s, Medellín was considered one of the most dangerous cities in the world and the epicenter of the global drug war.  In 1993, Colombia's homicide rate was 420 per 100,000 – the highest in the world. Medellin witnessed 6,349 killings in 1991, a murder rate of 381 per 100,000 people.

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