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Haiti

100 Days After Matthew, Seven Years After the ‘Quake’: Is Haiti More Resilient?

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: Français | Español

The world’s third most affected country in terms of climatic events, Haiti seeks to better manage natural hazards to improve resilience


Haiti is highly vulnerable to natural hazards. Situated within the north Atlantic hurricane belt, andsat on top of the boundary between the Caribbean and North American plates, the risks are constant. However, this does not mean that disasters are inevitable.

100 jours après Matthieu, sept ans après le tremblement de terre : Haïti est-elle plus résiliente?

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: English | Español

Troisième pays au monde le plus touché en termes d’événements climatiques, Haïti cherche à mieuxgérer les risques naturels pour améliorer la résilience


Haïti est très vulnérable aux risques naturels. Situé dans la ceinture de l'ouragan de l'Atlantique Nord, etjuste au-dessus de la frontière entre les plaques des Caraïbes et de l'Amérique du Nord, les risques sont permanents. Toutefois, cela ne signifie pas que les catastrophes sont inévitables.

Rencontre avec des Haïtiens qui aident leur pays à se reconstruire après l’ouragan Matthew

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: English | Español

Nous avons visité la région la plus touchée pour voir comment les communautés se rétablissent après le passage de l’ouragan Matthew le 4 octobre 2016.

Deux mois après que l'ouragan ait dévasté les départements du sud d'Haïti, des efforts de reconstruction sont en cours. Dans certaines régions, des panneaux d’acier ondulés tout neufs scintillent sous le soleil, remplaçant les toits emportés par l'ouragan.

The farmers, engineers, and health workers helping rebuild Haiti after Matthew

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: Español | Français
We visited the most affected region to see how communities are recovering after the storm on October 4th, 2016.

Two months after Hurricane Matthew devastated the southern provinces of Haiti, rebuilding efforts are underway. In some areas, shiny new corrugated steel panels glimmer under the sun where the hurricane stripped away roofs.

One Part of Something Bigger

Israel Mallett's picture

It has been almost four years since I first became involved with the regional public-private dialogue initiative, the Caribbean Growth Forum (CGF). In June 2012, I walked into the conference room at University of the West Indies,  Mona Campus for the Launch of the first phase of the initiative and there was something electric in the air. It was new and fresh, but old fears lingered; was this to become 'just another regional talk-shop?'

Wide-eyed and optimistic I was determined that for my small part it wouldn't turn out that way.

Une prison, ancien lieu de souffrance en Haïti, devient un lieu culturel et religieux

Berdine Edmond's picture


C'est la première fois que je pénètre dans l’enceinte de l’ancienne prison du Cap-Haïtien destinée aux femmes, prisonniers de droits communs et politiques. L’espace est saisissant : des arbres majestueux projettent leurs ombres sur l’espace de 10 000m2 où se dressent encore les murs fissurés jaunes et roses de plus de six mètres de hauteur. La beauté et le silence du lieu contrastent avec son histoire récente.

Latin America: Is There Hope for Prosperity After the Commodity Price Boom?

Katia Vostroknutova's picture

This blog was previously published in The World Post.

Talk about ‘growth’ in Latin America has become less upbeat today than a few years ago. That’s no surprise. For over a decade, average growth meant at least double the economic activity that we are seeing today. 

#Youthbiz: Thousands of Young Entrepreneurs Discuss Innovation, Growth and Jobs Creation with World Economic Leaders

Luis Viguria's picture
Also available in: Español

Young entrepreneurs from Latin America

Thousands of young entrepreneurs from 43 countries across the world took part in a series of online and onsite dialogues as part of the Road to Lima 2015 activities. The inclusion of youth in such an important process was possible thanks to the World Bank Group and the Young Americas Business Trust (YABT).

Part of the #Youthbiz movement? Share your story!

Valerie Lorena's picture
Also available in: Español

Also available in: Français | العربية
 



A boat trip from Port Elizabeth to Kingstown, in the Caribbean country of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, is a one-hour trip that locals take several times a day. It was during one of these journeys that the boat of Kamara Jerome, a young Vincentian fisherman, ran out of gas six miles from Bequia City in what is termed locally as the "Bequia Channel." While waiting for help with strong wind gusts and the sun on his head, the idea of developing a boat that would run with wind and solar energy was born. Soon after, the idea became a prototype; a boat using green technology was on the water making 20-year-old Jerome a winner of international innovation competitions and a role model to other Caribbean youth. 
 
In Mexico, young engineer Daniel Gomez runs a multimillion bio-diesel company originally conceived as a research project for his high school chemistry class. Gomez and his partners - Guillermo Colunga, Antonio Lopez, and Mauricio Pareja - founded SOLBEN (Solutions in bio-energy in Spanish) in their early twenties. 
 
Although Daniel and Kamara have different educational backgrounds, they do share one important skill, the ability to identify a problem, develop an innovative solution, and take it to the market. In other words, being an entrepreneur, an alternative to be economically active, that seems to work and not only for a few.

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