Syndicate content

Nicaragua

Is the school day too short in Latin America?

Peter Holland's picture

Also available in Español, Portuguese

Do longer classroom hours equal good grades? Spending more time in school is a subject currently being discussed as one solution to improving students' academic performance with the ultimate goal of making countries more competitive in the global economy.

This is true for emerging and advanced economies alike.

Vingt ans plus tard, on ne parle toujours pas assez de sexe

Keith Hansen's picture

Also available in English, Spanish, Portuguese 

 

Au cours des vingt dernières années, cette région a considérablement accru le niveau des échanges sur l’épidémie et le degré de sensibilisation. Les pays ont élaboré des stratégies nationales de lutte contre le VIH/sida (a), intégré les programmes de lutte contre l’épidémie à leurs systèmes de santé et sont parvenus à informer et sensibiliser la quasi-totalité du grand public sur les facteurs de risque du VIH.

 

Cependant, on continue à ne pas assez parler de sexe.

 

Latin America: are we forever at the mercy of high oil prices?

Ariel Yepez's picture

También disponible en español

 

A few weeks ago a rare storm event known as "Derecho" ravaged the Washington, DC area, claiming many lives and leaving 1.3 million homes and business without electricity. My house was unfortunately among those hit hard by the power outage and in an attempt to cope with the 90F+ temperatures unleashed by the storm, we moved down to the basement -- generally, the coolest part of the house.

For the first few days the novelty was fun for the kids, but as the days wore on, frustration grew, in part because we had no idea when the power would come back on.

Two Decades Later, We’re Still Not Talking Enough About Sex

Keith Hansen's picture

También disponible en español, portuguese, francés

Over the past two decades the region has significantly raised the level of the conversation and awareness around the issue, developing national HIV/AIDS strategies, integrating responses to the epidemic into health systems and ensuring almost universal awareness of HIV risk factors.
 

But we’re still not talking enough about sex.

 

Central America: learning how to create better jobs

Ana María Oviedo's picture

También disponible en español

Trabajo informal en Centroamerica

 

The global events of the last few years, beginning with the 2008 financial crisis, have revived the debate around job creation as a key element for economic recovery.

 

In Central America, the global financial crisis had a significant effect on production and employment, and even though the region has recovered, the debate regarding how to create better jobs is still going strong.

 

Rio + 20, Latin America and the World Bank

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture

También disponible en español

 

Latin America will attend the Rio+20 conferences safe in the knowledge that they have done a good job over the past few years, but with the shared international need to keep pushing for environmental policies which will help create a more sustainable world.

The region is home to examples of world-class innovative projects, but also faces far-reaching challenges for the future in terms of green growth. The decisions that we take today will shape development for the next 20 or 30 years, according to this video blog from Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez, Director for Sustainable Development for Latin America and the Caribbean. 

 

Latin America to the world: lessons learned on austerity, growth, reforms

Hasan Tuluy's picture

También disponible en español

Made in Latin America

'Made in Latin America'. Wouldn't that be a great label? --one that would slowly work its way out of the realm of some imaginary Latin American products to become a real seal of approval for many endeavors and accomplishments by the region.

I'm in Miami for the Seventh Annual Latin America Conference to talk about the region's prospects to decision makers, and I can't think of a better place to come up with such label --'My-ami', I muse, the Latin American economic and social melting pot that has been called many times the region's business capital.

So-called natural disasters are not unpredictable

Niels Holm-Nielsen's picture

También disponible en español

 

No two earthquakes in the world cause equal damage, according to scientists. This is particularly true in Latin America, a land of contrasts.

Whereas in 2010, an earthquake measuring 7 on the Richter scale ravaged Haiti, claiming nearly a quarter of a million lives, a few weeks ago in Mexico, an earthquake of similar magnitude (7.4) caused only a few cracks and minor injuries.

Making Latin America’s decade a reality

Hasan Tuluy's picture

También disponible en español

Making Latin America’s decade a reality

As I get ready to join the discussions on Latin America's development at the IDB's Montevideo Assembly, one word keeps coming to me in slow motion, like scenes from a movie: part-ner-ships.

It is easy to see why such word is so important these days of uncertainty in global markets and economies -where joining efforts has been the sensible way forward and out of major peril.

Doubling down on early childhood development in Latin America and the Caribbean

Keith Hansen's picture

También disponible en Español

Centro Aeiotú, Bogotá. / Foto: Yanina Budkin

Two years after the World Bank joined forces with Shakira and ALAS to create the Early Childhood Initiative, a happy second birthday for the program will mean millions of happier birthdays for children throughout the region.

About 5 million children and their mothers are already enjoying the benefits of this initiative which has seen investments of $400 million—more than double what we expected by this stage, and $100 million more than the total forecast for the program overall.

Follow the conversation on Facebook.

Pages