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Disasters

Quatre ans après, retour sur l'action de la communauté OpenStreetMap en réponse au séisme qui a frappé Haïti

Robert Soden's picture
Also available in: English

Cartes OpenStreetMap montrant Port-au-Prince (Haïti) le 12 janvier 2010 et le 30 janvier 2012
Images : Mikel Maron


Avec le lancement cette semaine du guide pratique fournissant des conseils pour planifier un projet de cartographie Open Cities, il nous a semblé important de revenir sur les accomplissements qui ont inspiré l'équipe Open Cities. 

4 Years On, Looking Back at OpenStreetMap Response to the Haiti Earthquake

Robert Soden's picture
Also available in: Français
With this week’s launch of the guide to Planning an Open Cities Mapping Project, it is important to return to earlier work that inspired the Open Cities team. 

It has now been more than four and a half years since the January 12, 2010 earthquake devastated one of the most vulnerable countries in the Western Hemisphere.  Just before 5pm local time on, a 7.0 magnitude earthquake struck Haiti. The epicenter was near the town of Leogane, about 20 miles west of the capital city Port-au-Prince.  The heavy block and concrete style construction of the capital— intended to withstand hurricane force winds—collapsed and caused massive loss of life and injury. It is now estimated that over 40,000 people died and over 1 million were displaced. As many as 40% of Haiti’s civil servants were injured or killed, and the majority of government buildings were damaged or destroyed.  The World Bank along with donor governments and other international organizations launched one of the largest disaster relief and reconstruction efforts in history. 

Lessons I learned while building shared homes in Port-au-Prince

Lora Vicariot's picture
Also available in: Español


Delmas 32 is a tangled web of narrow alleys, defined by haphazard housing and makeshift structures. This community has been digging its way out of the 2010 earthquake, slowly but surely, and large piles of sand, rubble, bricks, and rebar pushing to the sky are a constant reminder of the work that remains.