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Climate Change

How to prepare a country to respond to a disaster

Diana Rubiano's picture
Also available in: Español
Ecuador is paying more and more attention to data collection and disaster risk management across sectors​.
 Paul Salazar.
The Cruz-Castro Family searching for their belongings after the 2016 earthquake in Pedernales, Ecuador. Photo: Paul Salazar / World Bank.
Disasters occur worldwide and are part of everyone’s life. Ever since they were first recorded, floods, hurricanes and earthquakes have marked the history of humanity and its evolution. Today, our efforts focus on preparing for and responding to the impacts of these events. This way we can reduce material damages and human suffering.

Disaster risk management is a priority for many countries in the Latin America and the Caribbean region.

Resilient Haitian cities – live today but think about tomorrow!

Sameh Wahba's picture


Landing in Port-au-Prince awakens your senses. Exiting the airplane, you are re-energized by the explosion of colors, the welcoming smiles, and the warm weather – particularly when coming from a cold January in Washington, D.C.  Loud honking, a high density of houses and buildings, and streets bustling with pedestrians and small informal businesses are all evidence of the rapid urbanization process in Haiti.
As soon as you land, the challenges of the city are evident; Port-au-Prince expands to the ocean on flat plains exposed to flooding and quickly rises on steep hills with challenging access and risks of landslides and flash floods.  The reconstruction efforts after the earthquake in 2010 are still ongoing, and many of the houses seem to be hanging from the sky, perched on steep slopes. If you look at the houses from afar they appear as a single skyscraper, as distance makes the houses seem as if they are built on top of the one another. These false skyscrapers are highly exposed to landslides, flooding and earthquakes.

Bolivia’s path to urban resilience

Melanie Kappes's picture
Also available in: Español
A house after a flood in Bolivia. World Bank.

Imagine you live in a city that floods, sometime for weeks, after extreme rainfalls.

Imagine you live in that flooded city, where you and thousands of your neighbors must find a place to stay till the water has receded, and you finally can get back home, with the fear of finding it devastated.

The city of Trinidad is a place like this, located in Bolivia’s Amazonian low-lands, and with heavy prolonged precipitation, rivers, lagoons and lakes rise, affecting thousands of families.

Overall in Bolivia, 43% of the population lives in areas of high flood risk. Trinidad and other cities in the low-lands experience inundations, while in La Paz, Bolivia’s political center, frequent landslides lead to fatalities and damage to housing and infrastructure.

Promoting nationally aligned climate action in Latin American cities

Min Jung Kwon's picture
Also available in: Español
Urban populations are booming, and the choices that local governments make today about managing their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions directly impact the long-term health and economic well-being of their cities. Climate action at the local level is critical; however, most cities in low and middle-income countries have yet to integrate low carbon strategies into their planning process.

A monster attacked the Caribbean: time to rebuild thinking about the next one

Saurabh Dani's picture
Also available in: Español
 
 

 
“Hurricane Irma was so big that the entire eye of the storm covered all [160km2] of Barbuda.”
 
So starts the chilling story by a Red Cross volunteer who rode out the Cat 5 storm at home on this island, that has been all but obliterated. Hurricane Irma was the first storm in recorded history that sustained a Cat 5 status for over 3 days.

In Brazil, electricity meters transform lives and enlighten businesses

Christophe de Gouvello's picture
Also available in: Portuguese

Buyers agreed to destroy obsolete equipment to prevent its reuse in the power distribution network

What do electricity meters and mobile phones have in common? Answer: both are present in millions of Brazilian homes and both become electronic waste as soon as they are discarded. Though they do not contain heavy metals, their materials pose risks from the moment they are discarded in waste dumps or landfills.
 

Rencontre avec des Haïtiens qui aident leur pays à se reconstruire après l’ouragan Matthew

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: English | Español

Nous avons visité la région la plus touchée pour voir comment les communautés se rétablissent après le passage de l’ouragan Matthew le 4 octobre 2016.

Deux mois après que l'ouragan ait dévasté les départements du sud d'Haïti, des efforts de reconstruction sont en cours. Dans certaines régions, des panneaux d’acier ondulés tout neufs scintillent sous le soleil, remplaçant les toits emportés par l'ouragan.

The farmers, engineers, and health workers helping rebuild Haiti after Matthew

Mary Stokes's picture
Also available in: Español | Français
We visited the most affected region to see how communities are recovering after the storm on October 4th, 2016.

Two months after Hurricane Matthew devastated the southern provinces of Haiti, rebuilding efforts are underway. In some areas, shiny new corrugated steel panels glimmer under the sun where the hurricane stripped away roofs.

Le programme national de recherche bolivien sur le blé : une initiative réussie de recherche collaborative

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: English | Español

L’Institut National Bolivien pour l’Innovation Agricole et Forestière (INIAF) -Bolivia

« Ne perdez pas votre temps avec des programmes locaux d’amélioration génétique si quelqu’un peut améliorer les semences pour vous. Nous sommes un petit pays, et n’avons pas les moyens de réinventer la roue ». C’était un conseil  pragmatique d’un agronome bhoutanais en visite en Bolivie il y a quelques années. Sa déclaration pourrait s’avérer véridique principalement dans les pays aux réserves financières limitées. Cependant, je crois fermement que la mise en œuvre d’innovations agricoles exigent un rapprochement du global au local dans le cadre d’un partenariat mutuel, avec de fortes capacités mises en place sur le terrain. En voici un exemple.

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