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Education

Do Central American universities pass muster?

Felipe Jaramillo's picture

Also available in español

A visit to Asia is always bittersweet. I am amazed and seduced by Asia’s enormous success. And to be honest, it also makes me a bit envious.

I am especially impressed by their focus on the quality of education.

Système de santé en Haïti : mettre le patient au premier plan

Maryanne Sharp's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Un arbre lui procure un peu d’ombre mais ne la protège guère de la chaleur. Chantal vient de faire la lessive familiale à la rivière. Elle est enceinte de quatre mois.

Nous sommes à une soixantaine de kilomètres au nord de la capitale haïtienne, Port-au-Prince. Le hameau où vit Chantal compte à peine vingt maisons, n’est relié que par un seul chemin de terre et ne dispose d’aucune structure médicale.

Putting the patient first in Haiti's health system

Maryanne Sharp's picture

También disponible en español y en francés

The tree provides shade but scant respite from the heat. Chantal, four months pregnant, has just returned from washing her family’s clothes in the nearby river.

Her small village, just twenty houses and a single dirt road located about 60 kilometers north of the capital Port-au-Prince, has no health facilities of any kind. The nearest health post (staffed for two hours a day by a high school graduate) is an hour’s walk away while the nearest health center is two.

Is the school day too short in Latin America?

Peter Holland's picture

Also available in Español, Portuguese

Do longer classroom hours equal good grades? Spending more time in school is a subject currently being discussed as one solution to improving students' academic performance with the ultimate goal of making countries more competitive in the global economy.

This is true for emerging and advanced economies alike.

Two Decades Later, We’re Still Not Talking Enough About Sex

Keith Hansen's picture

También disponible en español, portuguese, francés

Over the past two decades the region has significantly raised the level of the conversation and awareness around the issue, developing national HIV/AIDS strategies, integrating responses to the epidemic into health systems and ensuring almost universal awareness of HIV risk factors.
 

But we’re still not talking enough about sex.

 

Rio + 20, Latin America and the World Bank

Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez's picture

También disponible en español

 

Latin America will attend the Rio+20 conferences safe in the knowledge that they have done a good job over the past few years, but with the shared international need to keep pushing for environmental policies which will help create a more sustainable world.

The region is home to examples of world-class innovative projects, but also faces far-reaching challenges for the future in terms of green growth. The decisions that we take today will shape development for the next 20 or 30 years, according to this video blog from Ede Ijjasz-Vasquez, Director for Sustainable Development for Latin America and the Caribbean. 

 

Jamaica: Jamming about jobs for young people

Fabio Pittaluga's picture

 Young Jamaicans discovering opportunities on the Web. Photo: @digitaljam2 

Talk about a new kind of jamming in Jamaica. Reggae, dancehall, ska step aside. Thousands of Jamaican youth are expected to jam to jobs, jobs and more jobs when they get together at the end of the month for Digital Jam 2.0, a virtual job fair with global accents.

Digital Jam 2.0, the future of work is online, brings together Jamaica’s youth population with national and international investors as well as young start ups and established companies, at a time when the country’s unemployment hovers around 31 percent, with young Jamaicans bearing the brunt of this crisis. 

Doubling down on early childhood development in Latin America and the Caribbean

Keith Hansen's picture

También disponible en Español

Centro Aeiotú, Bogotá. / Foto: Yanina Budkin

Two years after the World Bank joined forces with Shakira and ALAS to create the Early Childhood Initiative, a happy second birthday for the program will mean millions of happier birthdays for children throughout the region.

About 5 million children and their mothers are already enjoying the benefits of this initiative which has seen investments of $400 million—more than double what we expected by this stage, and $100 million more than the total forecast for the program overall.

Follow the conversation on Facebook.

Haiti: two years after quake, tangible signs of progress

James Martone's picture

Available in: Español, Português

Milome Brilliere Elementary now has walls and a roof after the old school totally collapsed in the 2010 quake

Twelve months ago, Milome Brilliere Elementary in Port-au-Prince was still operating out of a temporary structure made of canvas and old wood.  When we visited a few weeks ago -as part of a mission to record the progress of reconstruction in Haiti- new concrete walls had been constructed and a permanent roof was finally in place.

Clémont Renold, an unemployed father of three, stood out front. "It's a great relief," he said of the new school and the international efforts to boost Haiti's education system.

First two years of life are key to good jobs

Omar Arias's picture

In President Ollanta Humala's Peru just as in all of Latin America making good grades in school, finding a good job and having access to opportunities to get ahead largely depend on a single number: the first 1,000 days in the life of an individual, in other words, from conception to age two.

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