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Environment

Mexico and India learn together how to grow while respecting the environment

Muthukumara Mani's picture
Also available in: Español
Although 9000 miles apart, the states of Himachal Pradesh (India) and Quintana Roo (Mexico) have one thing in common: a vision and mission of promoting an economic growth that reaches as many people as possible while respecting the environment and the natural resources. This is what we call inclusive green growth.

Both the states are endowed with nature’s bounty and its curse: rich in biodiversity and the ecosystem services that it provides but highly vulnerable to the climate change and natural disasters and environmental degradation that development impacts bring.

Environmental sustainability and climate change resilience are thus a top priority, and it is no surprise that both the states are leaders and frontrunners in formulating green growth and development strategies in their respective countries.
It was therefore very apt for a delegation of senior officials from the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh to visit Quintana Roo to exchange ideas, share knowledge and best practices with their counterparts.

 
Indian Officials Visit Mexico To Exchange Experiences on Climate Change Issues

The most “human” bike-sharing system in the world lives in Buenos Aires

Andres Gartner's picture
Also available in: Español



As porteñas as tango, yellow bicycles from the Buenos Aires’ bike-sharing system have undoubtedly become a part of the urban landmark. In a city dominated by buses and taxis, bicycles have recently made a comeback and are slowly reclaiming the road through the bike sharing system –or bicing as we all call it. Known as Ecobici, this system has celebrated the millionth trip last December and is here to stay.

What makes Ecobici different from other bike sharing systems around the world? We think it’s about two simple answers: it is operated manually and doesn’t cost an Argentinian peso.

Panama: plan, prepare, mitigate – key actions for disaster prevention

Jeannette Fernandez's picture
Also available in: Español

Tiny homes made of non-reinforced concrete blocks, without columns in the corners or ties where the walls and roof and the walls and foundation meet. These are dwellings that can collapse like a deck of cards in the event of an earthquake. Photo: World Bank.

I have lived in Panama City for nearly two years and there are two things that still capture my attention: the traffic that gets worse by the day due to the more than 36,000 new vehicles on the road every year and the pace of construction.
The number of new buildings popping up in the city daily is amazing.

Huge, luxurious, expensive buildings in fashionable areas, but also housing projects promoted by the national government and a large supply of houses for the Panamanian middle class responsible for the private sector.

Latin America: Should this Earth Day be different from others?

Karin Erika Kemper's picture

También disponible en español e português

It’s tempting to think that this is just another Earth Day – after all, it has been celebrated since 1970. But perhaps this year should be different, at least in Latin America and the Caribbean.

This year marks the third year of drought for Northeast Brazil - still affecting some 10 million people, according to recent reports; a year when Buenos Aires and Rio de Janeiro suffered torrential rains and floods, impacting hundreds of thousands of people in these large metropolitan areas.

Haitian small farmers breaking new ground in agriculture

Diego Arias's picture

Three years after the earthquake, small farmers in Haiti are sowing seeds of prosperity. They know money doesn’t grow on trees, especially after the terrible events of January 2010, which threw the country’s economy into a tailspin.

But they also know they can count on vital resources becoming available to them free from red tape.

Haïti: cinq voeux pour 2013

Hasan Tuluy's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Trois ans après le tremblement de terre, Haïti a progressé dans des domaines de développement clés, y compris l'éducation, l'économie et la gestion des risques liés aux catastrophes naturelles. Dans ce video blog, le vice-président régional Hasan Tuluy partage ses cinq voeux principaux pour Haïti en 2013. 
 

Haiti: top five wishes for 2013

Hasan Tuluy's picture

También disponible en español y francés

Three years after the earthquake, Haiti has made gains in key development areas including education, the economic environment and managing the risk of natural hazards. In this video blog, World Bank regional Vice President Hasan Tuluy shares his top five wishes for Haiti in 2013.

Latin America 4 degrees warmer? Not cool!

Erick Fernandes's picture

También disponible en español y portugués

So you may be wondering if those scenes from the movie 2012 are not too much of a stretch after all, huh?

In the Hollywood blockbuster, apocalyptic images of rising oceans, erupting volcanoes and crumbling cities prelude the end of the world as we know it. Well, let me tell you that even though I’m not a great fan of end-of-days films –I think they oversimplify issues and de-sensitize the public-- I do believe that the world as we know it is on a path to dangerous climate change

Is Mexico ready for its next big storm or earthquake?

Gloria M. Grandolini's picture

También disponible en español

With its long trail of death and destruction spanning the Caribbean and the US East Coast, hurricane Sandy will surely be remembered as one of the most damaging storms in recent history. As I write this blog, Sandy has claimed over 100 lives and caused more than US$50 billion in damages.

After ravaging Cuba, Haiti and Jamaica, Sandy took a turn to the Northeast, instead of pursuing a westerly trajectory, sparing the Gulf of Mexico coastline from its deadly punch.

Garantir un accès durable à l’eau potable dans les zones rurales d’Haïti

Victoria Flamant's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Alphonsine et ses enfants doivent parcourir de longs kilomètres à pied pour pouvoir se procurer l’eau potable dont la famille a besoin tous les jours. Ils consacrent plus de dix heures par semaine à cette corvée ; ils partent de préférence au petit matin avant que la chaleur ne les accable trop. Le taux de couverture en eau dans les zones rurales d’Haïti est toujours le plus faible du continent américain : 55 % seulement de la population a accès à une source d’eau potable améliorée, contre 80 % en moyenne pour les zones rurales d’Amérique latine et des Caraïbes, selon l’OMS et l’UNICEF.

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