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Environment

Brazilian family farms go high tech

Diego Arias's picture
Also available in: Portuguese | Español
Cleyton, Osni and Zenaide Meyer
The Meyer family from Anitapolis, Santa Catarina, southern Brazil

A rude awakening by geese screaming at my door was not the way I envisioned starting my day. With temperatures near freezing, the 6.00 AM milking session seemed a daunting first task in my 12-hour internship as a family farmer in Santa Catarina, Brazil. 

Le programme national de recherche bolivien sur le blé : une initiative réussie de recherche collaborative

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: English | Español

L’Institut National Bolivien pour l’Innovation Agricole et Forestière (INIAF) -Bolivia

« Ne perdez pas votre temps avec des programmes locaux d’amélioration génétique si quelqu’un peut améliorer les semences pour vous. Nous sommes un petit pays, et n’avons pas les moyens de réinventer la roue ». C’était un conseil  pragmatique d’un agronome bhoutanais en visite en Bolivie il y a quelques années. Sa déclaration pourrait s’avérer véridique principalement dans les pays aux réserves financières limitées. Cependant, je crois fermement que la mise en œuvre d’innovations agricoles exigent un rapprochement du global au local dans le cadre d’un partenariat mutuel, avec de fortes capacités mises en place sur le terrain. En voici un exemple.

Bolivia’s National Research Program on Wheat: A success story of collaborative research

Francisco Obreque's picture
Also available in: Español | Français

Wheat-Program-INIAF-Bolivia

“Don’t waste your time in local breeding programs if someone else can improve the seed for you. We are a small country and cannot afford to reinvent the wheel”. This was the pragmatic advice of a Bhutanese agro-scientist visiting Bolivia a few years ago. His statement might be true, especially in resource-limited countries. However, I strongly believe that implementing agricultural innovations requires bridging the global with the local in a two-way partnership, with strong capabilities in the field. Here's a good example.  

A better way to build -- promoting sustainable infrastructure

Robert Montgomery's picture
Also available in: Español

As countries prepare to meet at the G20 summit in Turkey next week, global growth and infrastructure needs will be at the top of decision makers’ concerns. And rightly so: Infrastructure – roads, bridges, ports, power plants, water supply – drive economic growth in many countries by facilitating manufacturing, services and trade. But it’s not just a matter of building more. To achieve good development on a planet stressed by climate change and diminishing natural resources, infrastructure needs to be sustainable.

Lima, from Gastronomic Center to Capital of Urban Transformation

Eric Dickson's picture
Also available in: Español

Vista de la costa de Lima

‘Oh you’re going to Lima? I’ve heard the food is supposed to be amazing’. So goes the typical comment I get from friends and family when I would mention my work related travel plans. And in this sense the city does indeed live up to what is now internationally recognized. In my short amount of time in Lima I discovered it has a gorgeous historic downtown area, a stunning coastline peppered with manicured parks in the upscale parts of town, and a largely flat topography coupled with a near complete lack of rain.

Cooperation, the key for climate action in Latin America and the Caribbean

Pablo Benitez's picture
Also available in: Español
Vista del Chacaltaya, un nevado de Bolivia donde la nieve ha desaparecido.
View from Chacaltaya, a formally snow-covered peak where the snow has disappeared.

Mountain climbers and skiers are witness to major changes in the Andean landscape over the past few decades. The main snow-covered peaks of the Andes have already lost between 30% and 50% of their glaciers. Climate models predict that this massive loss will continue in the coming decades as a result of global warming.

Mexico and India learn together how to grow while respecting the environment

Muthukumara Mani's picture
Also available in: Español
Although 9000 miles apart, the states of Himachal Pradesh (India) and Quintana Roo (Mexico) have one thing in common: a vision and mission of promoting an economic growth that reaches as many people as possible while respecting the environment and the natural resources. This is what we call inclusive green growth.

Both the states are endowed with nature’s bounty and its curse: rich in biodiversity and the ecosystem services that it provides but highly vulnerable to the climate change and natural disasters and environmental degradation that development impacts bring.

Environmental sustainability and climate change resilience are thus a top priority, and it is no surprise that both the states are leaders and frontrunners in formulating green growth and development strategies in their respective countries.
It was therefore very apt for a delegation of senior officials from the Indian state of Himachal Pradesh to visit Quintana Roo to exchange ideas, share knowledge and best practices with their counterparts.

 
Indian Officials Visit Mexico To Exchange Experiences on Climate Change Issues

The most “human” bike-sharing system in the world lives in Buenos Aires

Andres Gartner's picture
Also available in: Español



As porteñas as tango, yellow bicycles from the Buenos Aires’ bike-sharing system have undoubtedly become a part of the urban landmark. In a city dominated by buses and taxis, bicycles have recently made a comeback and are slowly reclaiming the road through the bike sharing system –or bicing as we all call it. Known as Ecobici, this system has celebrated the millionth trip last December and is here to stay.

What makes Ecobici different from other bike sharing systems around the world? We think it’s about two simple answers: it is operated manually and doesn’t cost an Argentinian peso.

Panama: plan, prepare, mitigate – key actions for disaster prevention

Jeannette Fernandez's picture
Also available in: Español

Tiny homes made of non-reinforced concrete blocks, without columns in the corners or ties where the walls and roof and the walls and foundation meet. These are dwellings that can collapse like a deck of cards in the event of an earthquake. Photo: World Bank.

I have lived in Panama City for nearly two years and there are two things that still capture my attention: the traffic that gets worse by the day due to the more than 36,000 new vehicles on the road every year and the pace of construction.
The number of new buildings popping up in the city daily is amazing.

Huge, luxurious, expensive buildings in fashionable areas, but also housing projects promoted by the national government and a large supply of houses for the Panamanian middle class responsible for the private sector.

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