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Information and Communication Technologies

In Latin America, Hard Hats and Tools are no longer only for Men

Maria Margarita Nunez's picture
Also available in: Español

Women that have joined road maintenance has increased significantly.

While driving around rural areas of Puno in Peru, Caaguazú in Paraguay or Granada in Nicaragua, do not be surprised to see women lifting rocks from the roads and using shovels and picks alongside men.  In fact, in the past 15 years, the number of women that have joined organizations in charge of routine road maintenance in Latin America has increased significantly and with this their life conditions have improved dramatically.

Building pro-growth coalition for reforms: The Caribbean Growth Forum

Andrea Gallina's picture

Nighttime in St George's, Grenada

What does it take to make reforms work in small island countries?

At the end of June 2013, twelve Caribbean countries presented a roadmap for growth in three areas -logistics and connectivity, investment climate, skills and productivity- to a broad audience of private sector representatives, international development institutions, regional organization, civil society and media. That event culminated a 7-month long phase during which policy-making was not the result of close-doors meetings, but a process of intense negotiation, consultations, and consensus building among all actors of each Caribbean country’s societies. All of which was documented in real time and in a transparent fashion by each government. Yes, business was not “business as usual”.
 
Reforms priorities were agreed and a calendar for implementation brushed on a power point slide in the wonderful framework of five stars Bahamian hotel…After the workshop lights, projects and microphones shut down, many of us went home with a familiar sound in our ears: and now what? Was it another “talkshop”?

Animation could mean jobs and serious business for Jamaican youths

Fabio Pittaluga's picture

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If they’re not talking about their idyllic beaches or reggae music, all you hear about Jamaica tends to focus on the social or economic problems that have affected the country in recent decades. Granted, no country is perfect, but  there is more to Jamaica than the usual stereotypes.

Last year, in an attempt to look outside of the box for solutions to the crippling youth unemployment rates, we worked together with the Government and came up with Digital Jam 2.0 – an initiative to generate employment in the growing virtual economy.

Jamaica: Jamming about jobs for young people

Fabio Pittaluga's picture

 Young Jamaicans discovering opportunities on the Web. Photo: @digitaljam2 

Talk about a new kind of jamming in Jamaica. Reggae, dancehall, ska step aside. Thousands of Jamaican youth are expected to jam to jobs, jobs and more jobs when they get together at the end of the month for Digital Jam 2.0, a virtual job fair with global accents.

Digital Jam 2.0, the future of work is online, brings together Jamaica’s youth population with national and international investors as well as young start ups and established companies, at a time when the country’s unemployment hovers around 31 percent, with young Jamaicans bearing the brunt of this crisis. 

There is nothing ‘Natural’ in Natural Disasters

Joaquin Toro's picture

In the last few months we have witnessed "natural events" that have resulted in huge disasters with tragic consequences. From the November Rio de Janeiro mudslides to the March Japan tsunami and, more recently and closer to home, the tornadoes that devastated large parts of Missouri, 'natural disasters' are becoming household names.

Facebook: show your “like” for the environment planting a tree

Carlos Molina's picture

Two Mexican developers are hoping to raise awareness about the environment with a Facebook application that takes a swipe at deforestation. TreePet lets users plant virtual trees that can be "transplanted" to real forests thanks to partnerships with 'green' organizations, say developers Rodrigo Lopez and Claudia Gonzalez. They received praise and honorable mentions at the World Bank Applications for Development competition that rewarded 13 other programmers for their inventiveness to push forward the development agenda. Here's our video conversation with them.