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Poverty

In Latin America, Hard Hats and Tools are no longer only for Men

Maria Margarita Nunez's picture
Also available in: Español

Women that have joined road maintenance has increased significantly.

While driving around rural areas of Puno in Peru, Caaguazú in Paraguay or Granada in Nicaragua, do not be surprised to see women lifting rocks from the roads and using shovels and picks alongside men.  In fact, in the past 15 years, the number of women that have joined organizations in charge of routine road maintenance in Latin America has increased significantly and with this their life conditions have improved dramatically.

Will more debt hinder the development of the Dominican Republic?

Also available in: Español

Co-Authors: Aleksandra Iwulska, Javier Eduardo Báez and Alan Fuchs

In April this year the Dominican Republic borrowed 1.25 billion US dollars on international markets in 30-year bonds. The DR is the only country in the B investment rating group that  successfully issued 30-year bonds in the last 6 years. The country has a total of 2.75 billion US dollars for three issuances in the past 15 months.

At the same time, debt levels have been growing in the country: non-financial sector public (NFPS) debt doubled from 18.3 percent of GDP in 2007 to 36.6 in the first quarter of 2014.When considering the DR Central Bank debt stock, levels would be already close to 47 percent of GDP. It is worth noticing that Jiménez and Ovalle (2011) estimated in 56.7% the debt to GDP the maximum debt to GDP threshold that investors would consider sustainable for the DR in 2013.  Meanwhile, interest payments reached a peak of 2.4 percent of GDP in 2012-13 and external debt stood at 25 percent of GDP in 2013, levels not seen since the economic crisis of 2003. But the economic realities in the DR now are much different than they were in 2003. GDP grew by 4.1 percent last year and 5.5 percent in the first quarter of 2014. The Central Bank forecasts the annual economic growth at 4.5 percent this year. Meanwhile, central government fiscal deficit dwindled from 6.6 percent of GDP in 2012 to 2.9 percent in 2013.

How avocados are changing the way of life of Peruvian farmers

Maria Margarita Nunez's picture
Also available in: Español
Recently planted avocado trees in the Alto Laran district, in Peru.
Recently planted avocado trees in the Alto Laran district, in Peru.

A five hours’ drive south of Lima lays the coastal provinces of Chincha. If one heads inland into the deserted mountains that are typical of costal Peru, one would be surprised to find agriculture blanketing the valley floor. For centuries local communities in these rugged terrains have been using water from small meandering streams to grow maize, and eke out a living by selling surpluses at nearby markets. However, in recent years the growth of industrial agriculture has squeezed these communities, making it hard for them to survive in these ancestral lands, forcing many of them to move to nearby cities such as Chincha Alta.

Lessons I learned while building shared homes in Port-au-Prince

Lora Vicariot's picture
Also available in: Español


Delmas 32 is a tangled web of narrow alleys, defined by haphazard housing and makeshift structures. This community has been digging its way out of the 2010 earthquake, slowly but surely, and large piles of sand, rubble, bricks, and rebar pushing to the sky are a constant reminder of the work that remains.

Brazil's dream goal for 2014

Mariana Ceratti's picture
Also available in: Portuguese | Español
Tamires Rodrigues, a Brazilian student, has some things in common with some of the world’s best strikers: she has, for example, a clear target and knows exactly how to send the ball straight into the goal.

Just as Tamires, Brazil wishes to score a dream goal – and it has got nothing to do with the upcoming World Cup. The country seeks to enroll 1 million people in the National Programme for Vocational Education and Employment (Pronatec, its acronym in Portuguese) until the end of 2014.

Haïti: cinq voeux pour 2013

Hasan Tuluy's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Trois ans après le tremblement de terre, Haïti a progressé dans des domaines de développement clés, y compris l'éducation, l'économie et la gestion des risques liés aux catastrophes naturelles. Dans ce video blog, le vice-président régional Hasan Tuluy partage ses cinq voeux principaux pour Haïti en 2013. 
 

Haiti: top five wishes for 2013

Hasan Tuluy's picture

También disponible en español y francés

Three years after the earthquake, Haiti has made gains in key development areas including education, the economic environment and managing the risk of natural hazards. In this video blog, World Bank regional Vice President Hasan Tuluy shares his top five wishes for Haiti in 2013.

Growing the middle class

Francisco Ferreira's picture

También disponible en español

Shoppers in Chile

Since the Great Recession of 2008, there has been a widespread sense of malaise among the American middle class. Their incomes are close to stagnant, employment has not recovered, and the gap between them and the famously rich top 1% continues to grow. Look south of the Rio Grande, though, and it is quite a different picture. In the last decade, moderate poverty (under U$ 4 a day) in Latin America and the Caribbean fell from over 40% to 28%.

Système de santé en Haïti : mettre le patient au premier plan

Maryanne Sharp's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Un arbre lui procure un peu d’ombre mais ne la protège guère de la chaleur. Chantal vient de faire la lessive familiale à la rivière. Elle est enceinte de quatre mois.

Nous sommes à une soixantaine de kilomètres au nord de la capitale haïtienne, Port-au-Prince. Le hameau où vit Chantal compte à peine vingt maisons, n’est relié que par un seul chemin de terre et ne dispose d’aucune structure médicale.

Latin America to the world: lessons learned on austerity, growth, reforms

Hasan Tuluy's picture

También disponible en español

Made in Latin America

'Made in Latin America'. Wouldn't that be a great label? --one that would slowly work its way out of the realm of some imaginary Latin American products to become a real seal of approval for many endeavors and accomplishments by the region.

I'm in Miami for the Seventh Annual Latin America Conference to talk about the region's prospects to decision makers, and I can't think of a better place to come up with such label --'My-ami', I muse, the Latin American economic and social melting pot that has been called many times the region's business capital.

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