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Social Development

The Americas look for a 360-degree approach to drugs

Sergio Jellinek's picture
Also available in: Español



Antigua may mean old in Spanish, but what has been accomplished here looks quite modern.

In this colonial city, a living example of Guatemala’s Mayan heritage, surrounded by mountains and volcanoes, foreign ministers from across the Americas have achieved what appeared if not impossible, very difficult: to create a space for inter-American dialogue to build a new continent-wide strategy in the fight against drug trafficking.

Brazil's dream goal for 2014

Mariana Ceratti's picture
Also available in: Portuguese | Español
Tamires Rodrigues, a Brazilian student, has some things in common with some of the world’s best strikers: she has, for example, a clear target and knows exactly how to send the ball straight into the goal.

Just as Tamires, Brazil wishes to score a dream goal – and it has got nothing to do with the upcoming World Cup. The country seeks to enroll 1 million people in the National Programme for Vocational Education and Employment (Pronatec, its acronym in Portuguese) until the end of 2014.

Is organic food more expensive to produce? Fact or fiction

Mary L. González's picture
Also available in: Español

My work with small-hold cocoa farmers in Nicaragua has taught me that it is not true that organic production is more expensive, complicated to learn and unsustainable.
 
The Sustainable Agroforestry Cocoa Production Project (COCOA-RAAN) was implemented within the Autonomous Region of the North Atlantic, the largest in Nicaragua, with a budget of just US$ 1.9 million.  
 

Colombia: the cup of coffee that changed the life of a whole community

Willem Janssen's picture

También disponible en español

Last Friday was International Women’s Day, but before adding to the general celebratory messages in cyberspace, I would like to tell you about a specific case that truly deserves to be celebrated.

If you are reading this blog while drinking coffee or after a coffee break, this story has to do with you.

Haïti: cinq voeux pour 2013

Hasan Tuluy's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Trois ans après le tremblement de terre, Haïti a progressé dans des domaines de développement clés, y compris l'éducation, l'économie et la gestion des risques liés aux catastrophes naturelles. Dans ce video blog, le vice-président régional Hasan Tuluy partage ses cinq voeux principaux pour Haïti en 2013. 
 

Do Central American universities pass muster?

Felipe Jaramillo's picture

Also available in español

A visit to Asia is always bittersweet. I am amazed and seduced by Asia’s enormous success. And to be honest, it also makes me a bit envious.

I am especially impressed by their focus on the quality of education.

Growing the middle class

Francisco Ferreira's picture

También disponible en español

Shoppers in Chile

Since the Great Recession of 2008, there has been a widespread sense of malaise among the American middle class. Their incomes are close to stagnant, employment has not recovered, and the gap between them and the famously rich top 1% continues to grow. Look south of the Rio Grande, though, and it is quite a different picture. In the last decade, moderate poverty (under U$ 4 a day) in Latin America and the Caribbean fell from over 40% to 28%.

Système de santé en Haïti : mettre le patient au premier plan

Maryanne Sharp's picture

Also available in English and Spanish

Un arbre lui procure un peu d’ombre mais ne la protège guère de la chaleur. Chantal vient de faire la lessive familiale à la rivière. Elle est enceinte de quatre mois.

Nous sommes à une soixantaine de kilomètres au nord de la capitale haïtienne, Port-au-Prince. Le hameau où vit Chantal compte à peine vingt maisons, n’est relié que par un seul chemin de terre et ne dispose d’aucune structure médicale.

Colombia: Getting due credit for disaster prevention

Gloria M. Grandolini's picture

También disponible en español

Natural disasters

Earthquakes, tsunamis, hurricanes, floods or droughts are the same worldwide. Whether in Mexico, Colombia, Haiti or Pakistan, these are natural events or "disasters" of varying intensity. 

What changes are the effects and consequences. Water and land become the mortal enemies of populations who pay the highest price with their lives and property.

Colombia: Building a Future without Violence with Juanes and Mi Sangre

Gloria M. Grandolini's picture

También disponible en español

money under the mattress

“A microphone, a guitar and a spray can; these are their weapons.” These could be the lyrics of a song by the wildly popular Juanes, but the singer-songwriter was actually referring to the work of his foundation, Mi Sangre, which campaigns for a Colombia free from violence for young people.

The Foundation’s programs offer Colombian youth, many of whom are victims of violence in the country -- 4,000 minors died in 2003-2006-- the chance to practice the art of singing, painting and composing to exorcize the threat of violence on the streets, in their neighborhoods, homes and schools. 

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