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Urban Development

“What Haiti taught us all”

Priscilla M. Phelps's picture
Also available in: Français

The January 2010 Haiti earthquake killed many thousands and caused damage and losses estimated at US$7.8 billion, more than US$3 billion of which was in the housing sector alone.

What might surprise those who have heard only anecdotal accounts of the shortcomings of the Haiti response is that some exemplary practices that emerged from that event have already been redeployed in other disaster responses.

Voix d'Haïti

Isabelle Schaefer's picture
Also available in: English | Español
Cinq ans après le séisme dévastateur qui a frappé la capitale d'Haïti et les villes voisines le 12 Janvier 2010, tuant près de 230 000 personnes, le pays continue à se reconstruire et le peuple haïtien montre des signes de résilience malgré l'incertitude politique actuelle. Presque tout le monde a une histoire à raconter.

« Peu importe à qui vous parlez en Haïti -le médecin de village, le petit entrepreneur à Port-au-Prince, le jeune étudiant universitaire - leur souhait est d'aller de l’avant, "a déclaré l’Envoyée spéciale de la Banque mondiale pour Haïti, Mary Barton –Dock.

Voices of Haiti

Isabelle Schaefer's picture
Also available in: Français | Español
Five years after a devastating earthquake hit Haiti’s capital and nearby towns on January 12, 2010, killing up to 230,000 people, the country continues to rebuild and the Haitian people show signs of resilience despite the current political uncertainty. Almost everyone has a story to tell.
 

A new path away from violence: the story of Raul

Jessica Gallegos's picture
Also available in: Español

Raul is short, skinny and has an enormous smile. Looking at him, it was hard to believe that this fifteen-year-old had long been feared in his community as a gang leader and had been the author of horrible crimes in Colonia Santa Marta in El Salvador.

Hackers for a revamped Bus System in Sao Paulo, Brazil

Diego Canales's picture
Also available in: Español


What happens when you grab an interdisciplinary group of skilled and highly motivated hackers, give them the task of improving the bus system of the city; and grant them full autonomy over the transport raw data which they had been trying to put their hands on for the last years?
 

Lessons I learned while building shared homes in Port-au-Prince

Lora Vicariot's picture
Also available in: Español


Delmas 32 is a tangled web of narrow alleys, defined by haphazard housing and makeshift structures. This community has been digging its way out of the 2010 earthquake, slowly but surely, and large piles of sand, rubble, bricks, and rebar pushing to the sky are a constant reminder of the work that remains.

“La buseta”, “el pesero” and other things we miss in public transportation from Bogota and Mexico City

Leonardo Canon Rubiano's picture

Safe, Clean, Affordable Transport is the motto of the World Bank’s Transport Sector. Evidence from several analyses for urban transport systems suggests that improving the transport system:
  • reduces passenger travel times, 
  • reduces GHG emissions due to transport, 
  • reduces vehicle operating costs for the transport system, and 
  • reduces transport-related road accidents (injuries and fatalities). 

Targeting motorcycle users to improve traffic safety in Latin America

Anna Okola's picture
Also available in: Español


Motorcycle riders and passengers have long been vulnerable users of motorized transport. In the Americas, with the increasing ownership of motorcycles, given the ease and lower costs, this trend is worrisome as the number of vulnerable users as well as those impacted by traffic crashes increases, sometimes masking a shift from pedestrian or bicycle casualties to motorcycle victims. These trends would be similar in regions such as Africa which also share the motorcycle-taxi (mototaxi) phenomenon.

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