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Dominican Republic

How a new insolvency regime increases opportunities for entrepreneurship in the Dominican Republic

Andrés F. Martínez's picture
Also available in: Español

View from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic / World Bank

Published in digital portal El Dinero

In the past, a company in the Dominican Republic facing financial difficulties, such as falling behind on tax payments and having outstanding debts with suppliers and cashflow problems, usually faced bankruptcy, with low rates of recovery.

Guaranteeing water security, a priority for Central America

Seynabou Sakho's picture
Also available in: Español
Corredor Seco, Honduras. Copyright: Angels Maso. World Bank. 

A few weeks ago, we had the opportunity to visit the "Federico Boquín" water treatment plant and dam in Tegucigalpa, one of the main sources of water supply for the Honduran capital. As we walked beside the local Mayor, "Tito" Asfura, who accompanied us during the visit, we discussed the relevance of this resource.
 

SMEs play starring role in the Dominican Republic

John Martin Wilson's picture
Also available in: Español


Aracelis owns a hair salon in Santo Domingo. Like all the other owners of the nearly 20,000 small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the Dominican Republic, she dreams about making her business thrive. SMEs in this Caribbean country employ more than 500,000 people, representing a key driver of economic growth. To make their businesses grow and achieve their goals, all business owners need one crucial ingredient: money.
 

In the Dominican Republic, Child Marriage Is Not Only a Moral Issue, But an Economic One as Well

Quentin Wodon's picture
Also available in: Español



In the Dominican Republic, more than one third of young women aged between 18 and 22 get married or form an informal union before turning 18, while one in five has already given birth before reaching that age. Child marriage is not only a moral issue; it also has economic impacts for the country.

One Part of Something Bigger

Israel Mallett's picture

It has been almost four years since I first became involved with the regional public-private dialogue initiative, the Caribbean Growth Forum (CGF). In June 2012, I walked into the conference room at University of the West Indies,  Mona Campus for the Launch of the first phase of the initiative and there was something electric in the air. It was new and fresh, but old fears lingered; was this to become 'just another regional talk-shop?'

Wide-eyed and optimistic I was determined that for my small part it wouldn't turn out that way.

Latin America: Is There Hope for Prosperity After the Commodity Price Boom?

Katia Vostroknutova's picture

This blog was previously published in The World Post.

Talk about ‘growth’ in Latin America has become less upbeat today than a few years ago. That’s no surprise. For over a decade, average growth meant at least double the economic activity that we are seeing today. 

Do rich and poor countries have different approaches to counter-cyclical spending?

Francisco G. Carneiro's picture
Understanding Macroeconomic Volatility: Part 2

The fact is that a government can soften a recession by increasing spending (the counter-cyclical approach) to raise demand and output. If government reduces spending (the pro-cyclical approach), the likely result is a deeper recession.

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