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The Latin American Development Forum: a decade documenting the economic development of the region

Santiago Pombo's picture
Also available in: Español
Latin American economists differ in their specific analyses of the recent boom in the region, but generally agree on the overall picture:
 
As Guillermo Perry observes, between 2003 and 2012, Latin America had the highest growth rates in several decades despite the effects of the 2009 global crisis. The region received an unprecedented volume of portfolio and foreign direct investment, improved its terms of trade on rising commodity prices, and benefited from the abundant international liquidity that came on the heels of the recession in the developed economies.
 

Latin America After the Boom: Lessons and Challenges

Guillermo Perry's picture
Also available in: Español

Latin America had the highest growth rates in several decades between 2003 and 2012, despite the effects of the 2009 global crisis. The boom of those years sparked unbridled optimism both in and outside the region. The Inter-American Development Bank (IADB) and several investment banks spoke of “the decade of Latin America,” as if we had finally taken off. And an unprecedented volume of portfolio and foreign direct investment flowed into our region.

A new path away from violence: the story of Raul

Jessica Gallegos's picture
Also available in: Español

Raul is short, skinny and has an enormous smile. Looking at him, it was hard to believe that this fifteen-year-old had long been feared in his community as a gang leader and had been the author of horrible crimes in Colonia Santa Marta in El Salvador.

Building pro-growth coalition for reforms: The Caribbean Growth Forum

Andrea Gallina's picture

Nighttime in St George's, Grenada

What does it take to make reforms work in small island countries?

At the end of June 2013, twelve Caribbean countries presented a roadmap for growth in three areas -logistics and connectivity, investment climate, skills and productivity- to a broad audience of private sector representatives, international development institutions, regional organization, civil society and media. That event culminated a 7-month long phase during which policy-making was not the result of close-doors meetings, but a process of intense negotiation, consultations, and consensus building among all actors of each Caribbean country’s societies. All of which was documented in real time and in a transparent fashion by each government. Yes, business was not “business as usual”.
 
Reforms priorities were agreed and a calendar for implementation brushed on a power point slide in the wonderful framework of five stars Bahamian hotel…After the workshop lights, projects and microphones shut down, many of us went home with a familiar sound in our ears: and now what? Was it another “talkshop”?

Prisons as places of inclusion

Sergi Perez's picture
Also available in: Español

Fotografía de la cárcel de Quencoro, en Cusco, Perú.

Visiting a prison does not leave you feeling indifferent. After exhaustive security checks, you find yourself amid a sea of personal stories – many of them tragic – and the statistics begin to take on a human face. Life in prison is much more difficult than we imagine: discipline, strict schedules, cells shared with up to 20 strangers and views of the horizon that end with a security fence.

Confirming the dreadful situation of most Latin American prisons is nothing new. Overcrowding and the lack of health strategies are, along with corruption and the absence of effective reinsertion plans, some of the challenges faced by authorities across the region.

Hackers for a revamped Bus System in Sao Paulo, Brazil

Diego Canales's picture
Also available in: Español


What happens when you grab an interdisciplinary group of skilled and highly motivated hackers, give them the task of improving the bus system of the city; and grant them full autonomy over the transport raw data which they had been trying to put their hands on for the last years?
 

Can the World Bank make a difference in a large middle-income country like Brazil?

Jiro Tominaga's picture
Also available in: Portuguese

One of the major aspirations of the World Bank is to make a real impact on the countries’ development. But when the Bank is a small player relative to the size of the country, can it be what we call transformational?

Lessons I learned while building shared homes in Port-au-Prince

Lora Vicariot's picture
Also available in: Español


Delmas 32 is a tangled web of narrow alleys, defined by haphazard housing and makeshift structures. This community has been digging its way out of the 2010 earthquake, slowly but surely, and large piles of sand, rubble, bricks, and rebar pushing to the sky are a constant reminder of the work that remains.

Channeling Caribbean diaspora dollars back home

Qahir Dhanani's picture


“We have the money, but it’s just not that easy to find the deals back home.” These words, from a Barbadian entrepreneur in Silicon Valley tell the story of a successful tech entrepreneur whose family left the Caribbean almost a generation ago. They moved to the USA and over the years he was able to build a successful business based in Northern California.

Going the last mile in Nicaragua: local communities pave the road to end poverty

Stephen Muzira's picture
Also available in: Español


I remember a visit to Nicaragua like it was only yesterday. Three years have passed, and it is still etched in my mind. I was visiting a road construction project when I realized that the paving surface was not the typical asphalt I was used to seeing on many road projects but some form of concrete like paving blocks known as adoquines.

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