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Providing electricity in Uganda

Makhtar Diop's picture
World Bank Africa VP at the Bujagali hydropower plant in Uganda


KAMPALA, Uganda--World Bank Africa Region Vice President Makhtar Diop, in Uganda for development talks with President Museveni, his Cabinet, and other development partners, visits the site of the World Bank Group-financed Bujagali Hydropower plant in Uganda, which at 240 MW now generates the bulk of the country's electricity needs.

“Sexual Violence is a Weapon of Mass Destruction”

Anne Senges's picture
Also available in: Français

Chemical, biological and nuclear weapons make the list of weapons of mass destruction, but Dr. Denis Mukwege, a gynecologist in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and one of this year’s Nobel Peace Prize nominees, wants to add one more: sexual violence. Every year, Panzi Hospital, which he founded in 2008 in the strife-torn Kivu Province in eastern DR Congo, treats 3,000 survivors of sexual violence. Then, through the Panzi Foundation, Dr. Mukwege works with equal fervor to reintegrate them into society. As part of our profile of news makers, we caught up with Dr. Mukwege while he was visiting the World Bank to speak at a seminar on the sexual violence in Kivu Province. “The Man Who Repairs Women,” the title of Mukwege’s biography by journalist Colette Braeckman, speaks about his fight.
 

The importance of linking development to peace and security

Makhtar Diop's picture
Also available in: Français
During the last week, we traveled in the Sahel region with UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and the leaders of the African Union Commission, the African Development Bank, and the European Union. The result was exciting. Please watch my video blog to learn more.
Sahel trip shows the importance of development linked to peace, security
 

Getting the remittance system right for Africa?

Soheyla Mahmoudi's picture

The remittances sent home every year by the African Diaspora should create a doorway to still greater opportunities, and the key to this door is financial access. While remittances do impact the living standards of beneficiaries directly, the banks that pay out the remittances month after month should offer recipient families a basic financial package including savings accounts, payment services and small loans for microenterprise.  This should facilitate growth from current levels of remittances saved and invested.  Leveraging of remittances through financial inclusion is certain to increase their development potential.

Africa, Stand Up!

Maleele Choongo's picture


Earlier this year, the World Bank got a taste of what African youth can bring to the table. I was one of 30,000 Twitter users participating in the #iwant2work4africa campaign. For months, we voiced our passion for Africa while shoehorning our qualifications to work for the continent, all in 140 characters.

5 Ways to Join African Ministers at Annual Meetings

Maleele Choongo's picture
Life won’t stop for the World Bank and IMF Annual Meetings this week, but like the true development junkie you are, you are already calculating how quickly you have to eat breakfast to make it in time for #EmpowerWomen.

Luckily, your good friends at the Africa Region are just as determined to make sure you stay in the loop. We sense your angst and we’ve got you covered.

Helping Africa win better deals for its minerals

Makhtar Diop's picture
Also available in: Français

Helping Africa win better deals for its minerals © jbdodane
With oil in Niger and Uganda, natural gas in Mozambique and Tanzania, iron ore in Guinea and Sierra Leone―African countries are increasingly finding rich new deposits of oil, gas, or minerals and just as quickly, attracting the courtship of international companies that are drawn to Africa’s new bonanza in extractives wealth.

Preparing African youth for high-paying engineering jobs

Peter Materu's picture
Also available in: Français
Training Young Engineers to Transform Africa


At the 2013 Global Social Venture Competition held at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business, two African students, Moctar Dembele and Gérard Niyondiko, won the first prize for creating an anti-malarial soap bar. They tested and developed this product at the International Institute of Water and Environmental Engineering in Burkina Faso, a small country in West Africa.

Preventing Maternal Mortality - A Yardstick for Social Justice

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

I was glad to read the announcement made by World Bank President, Dr. Jim Kim, at the start of this year’s UN General Assembly meetings, about the Bank’s projected financing support through the end of 2015 to help developing countries reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) for women and children’s health.  As we move toward the culmination of the MDGs in 2015 and beyond, preventing maternal and child deaths should be seen by all government delegations and their partners in the international development community as a clear yardstick to measure their commitment for creating more just and inclusive societies.

Working With New Partners to Build Skills in Africa

Sajitha Bashir's picture

While global economic growth has been sluggish in recent years, Africa has been growing. We’ve seen a resurgence of traditional sectors such as agriculture and the extractive industries as well as promising new ones such as ICT. Not surprisingly, these booming sectors need highly skilled technicians, engineers, medical workers, agricultural scientists and researchers. Yet large numbers of African graduates remain unemployed as their skills are often not in line with industry requirements. 

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