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Madagascar

Madagascar, a Country of a Thousand Hopes, a Country of a Thousand Vulnerabilities

Claudia Navalonirina Raobelina's picture
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In 2018, Madagascar is said to be one of the poorest countries in the world. Antananarivo is said to be the third dirtiest capital. Some diseases like the plague persist in the country, even in 2017. Moreover, more than 35% of adult Malagasy people are still illiterate. One can witness corruption on every level. Every morning, a new political scandal can be read through newspapers’ headlines.

My most heartfelt congratulations to Claudia Navalonirina Raobelina, winner of the first #Blog4Dev competition organized in Madagascar!

Coralie Gevers's picture
Also available in: Français


Photo: Mohamad Al-Arief/ The World Bank

For this first staging of the competition in Madagascar, young people were asked to share their vision for Madagascar, which is poor but endowed with abundant resources and potential, “Madagascar – land of a thousand smiles and a thousand sorrows.” Over 230 young people aged 18-28 submitted an entry to the competition. Thank you for your enthusiastic response!

Antananarivo: A city for whom?

Salim Rouhana's picture
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Photo: Michel Matera/World Bank


Planning is a theme in cities as ancient as Rome, Cairo, and Athens to as modern as New York and Singapore. It is used as an instrument to manage collective living. Planning remains key in shaping the urban contract of how and to what end people are willing to inhabit the same space.
 
Madagascar is witnessing rapid urbanization. From an overall population of 24.8 million (2016), the country has close to 7 million urbanites, compared to 2.8 million in 1993. Cities generate about 3/4 of the national GDP, with the capital city, Antananarivo, contributing more than 50%.

Madagascar 25 years later: Human development investments are making a difference!

Lynne Sherburne-Benz's picture
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Lynne Sherburne-Benz, World Bank Senior Regional Advisor for Africa, exchanges with young beneficiaries of the Madagascar Social Safety Net Project.


I first visited Madagascar in 1985 as a student doing research with FOFIFA, Madagascar’s national center for agricultural research. I was fortunate to be able to come back in the early 1990s as a task team leader for a project funded by the World Bank, at a time when the Bank was restructuring its projects to respond to drought in southern Madagascar. Over two decades later, here I am again in the South of this beautiful country, which is suffering again from drought and continues to be counted among the poorest countries in the world.