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Blog4Dev Burundi: New mentality, new growth!

Bernice Nasangwe's picture
Also available in: Français
Photo: Sarah Farhat/World Bank


“To succeed in life, you have to study hard and obtain your diploma with honors so that you can eventually land a high-paying job,” is what my father would tell me constantly. As a young girl, everything was clear to me: a diploma with honors would automatically land me a job with a salary as high as Bill Gates’s.

Breaking the vicious cycle of high inequality and slow job creation

Sébastien Dessus's picture
Keneuwe Monakale testing water quality at the pre-brew plant. The Alrode Brewery. Johannesburg South Africa. 23rd April 2008. The brewery is the largest in South africa. It produces 1,9 Million litres of per per day. The brewery employs some 900 fulltime and contract staff. Photo: Media Club/FlickR

Growth is picking up in South Africa, and this is good news after two years of declining incomes per capita. Observers are revising their forecasts, and optimists foresee economic growth to exceed 2% in next years. In recent months, several events have indeed improved South Africa’s economic outlook: the smooth transition in power, the authorities’ reaffirmed adherence to principles of good governance and debt stability, and the upward revision in national accounts, revealing higher economic activity in 2017 than previously measured.

In Côte d'Ivoire every story counts: The importance of learning a trade

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
Skills for Promising Jobs


When painting creates hope

"The project is good, it allows me to be an independent woman," says Edwige Domi, who recently completed training in building painting.  A resident of the Koumassi commune in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, she is carefully applying paint to a private building located at cité 80 logements in the commune. Beside her is Jean-Claude N'dri, who states that "it's a trade that opens many doors." 

#Blog4Dev: Vocation and technical training and access to credit would create jobs

Mowliid Ahmed Hassan's picture



During my years in college, the number of unemployed graduates in my city made me want to study harder, and seek the skills required in the workplace while I was still a student. Luckily, in my fourth year, I began volunteering for a local NGO. That volunteerism really scaled up my skills and later helped me get a fulltime job.
 
The general lack of vocational training and a still-nascent volunteerism culture remain the main reasons why the majority of Somali youth are unemployed. We can boost youth employment opportunities by not only building up their skills, but also by encouraging volunteerism as a pathway to employment.

#Blog4Dev: Could Somalia’s vibrant private sector produce goods Somali consumers need locally?

Mohamed Maqadin's picture



When the central government of Somalia collapsed in 1991, everything collapsed with it. Infrastructure was destroyed. Basic services, such as electricity and clean water, were no longer provided. Government institutions were looted. As a result, the economy disintegrated and the Somali people’s contract with the State became void. In the following years, the civil war and recurrent droughts forced many people to migrate or join extremist groups.
 
In recent years, however, the situation has gradually changed for the better. Government institutions are slowly recovering and becoming stronger, people are enjoying relative peace, and the economy is being revitalized by capital from the diaspora. Nonetheless, many challenges remain, including the most chronic one: youth unemployment.
 
How can we create job opportunities for the youth? One possible solution is establishing Small Production Businesses (SPB) in the country.

#Blog4Dev: Creating jobs and renewable energy at the same time

Abdishakur Ahmed's picture



The dramatic decrease in the cost of renewable energy technologies seen in recent years presents an unprecedented opportunity to improve our access to energy—and create employment in the process. This is especially true in Somaliland, where more than 80% of the local population of 3.5 million does not have access to modern electricity.
 
Somaliland’s small economy cannot afford large investments in the infrastructure needed for generating energy in the more traditional, 20th century sense. Running electricity lines over long distances to reach a geographically dispersed, off-grid population is simply uneconomical. Moreover, at US$0.85 per kilowatt, the cost of electricity in Somaliland is among the highest in the world.

How can green growth benefit Africa?

Eun Joo Allison Yi's picture
Photo: Sarah Farhat/World Bank Group


What exactly do we mean by green growth? For us, it’s not just about riding bikes and planting trees. The Korea Green Growth Trust Fund (KGGTF) defines green growth as adopting an innovative approach toward reaching nations’ goals for sustainable development and addressing climate change. It is a framework for decision-making and a proven process for turning people’s hopes into reality.

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