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Youth

To farm, or Not to farm? Changing the youth’s mindset is the answer

Mercy Melody Kayodi's picture



Let me answer it this way: If you are a youth, you are damned if you farm, and you will be equally damned if you don’t. Farming as an option is very key to enabling the continuous production of food to meet our consumption demand. We are in an era where we have to attract the young people to join food production, since majority of them think it is dirty work. Interacting with young farmers has only left me understanding that, besides the lack of mechanisation, we lack the best farming practices that would otherwise increase our earnings.

Why introducing school agricultural clubs could turn farming into the coolest thing ever

Joseph Kyanjo Lule's picture



Getting more youth to engage productively in agriculture is not, and won’t be, an easy job. As an aspiring goat farmer and student in agribusiness management, I know that it takes real passion and commitment to make a living from agriculture. I am currently rearing 40 free range goats on a small farm in my village. On average, I spend about Uganda Sh30,000 to rear each goat—which I normally sell off during the Christmas season at Shs 200,000. This year, I intend to use the money to expand the business, and invest in high value crops to take advantage of the free manure from the goats.

In Senegal, food security and women’s empowerment go hand in hand

Louise Cord's picture
Also available in: Français
© Dominic Chavez/World Bank


Senegal’s nutrition policy is at a crossroads. Reaching a critical moment where the effects of malnutrition could have a detrimental effect on generations of young Senegalese to come, the Government of Senegal is striving to make efforts to address the root problems of malnutrition. However, if these actions are taken without a conscious effort bolster the key role of women in nutrition, the country may not succeed in stymieing stunting and malnutrition in the country.

From Vocational Training to Employment in Senegal: Encouraging Youth to be the Engine of Growth

Mouhamadou Moustapha Lo's picture
Also available in: Français



Like many African countries, Senegal has a young population in search of decent jobs and salaries.  A report covering the last national census of the Senegalese population, published every ten years by l’Agence nationale de la statistique et de la démographie (ANSD) (National Statistics and Demographics Agency), reveals that the average age of the population is approximately 22 years and that one in every two Senegalese is under 18 years of age. Those under 15 years of age represent more than 42% of the population, clearly indicating the predominance of the youth demographic.  However, this segment of the population is most affected by under-employment and unemployment with young people representing 60% of job seekers.

Getting the Youth Voice Heard at Paris’s COP 21

Nelly Diane Alemfack's picture
Also available in: Français
According to Nelly Alemfack, center, "Young people across Africa must mobilize and band together to lobby their governments to do more," in the fight against climate change. 

The Earth’s temperatures are rising and it’s no secret. As an African, originally from Cameroon, I have personally witnessed the damaging effects and know that my continent and my people are significantly at risk if major steps are not taken to bring down the heat. While solutions and concrete actions exist to fight against climate change, they are only half the battle. The other half lies with the appropriation of these solutions by youth and future generations.

Lessons from the Mbongui

Gessye Ginelle Safou-Mat's picture
Also available in: Français

Lessons from the Mbongui
I was about 13 years old when my family organized a trip to the village of Mpangou, in the Republic of the Congo. Travelling to the village was an event for us kids of the city – a new world. I remember packing our generators, cd players and speakers to bring a bit of our urban lives with us, and my mother telling us to buy candies and biscuits as gifts for the people. The road was full of potholes, and the men often had to push our cars forward through the mud, but at last, we got there.

Reaping the fruit of determination

Guangzhe CHEN's picture


The highlands of Ethiopia, especially Tigray, were notorious for their severely degraded land. High population density, unchanged agricultural practices, climate change, the steep topography and intermittent and extreme rainfalls are the main causes of land degradation in the area.

Career opportunities for young Africans at the World Bank

Maleele Choongo's picture

Through targeted programs and internships, the World Bank benefits from investing in the talent of young African professionals, and has much to gain by investing in more. Below is a list of career opportunities available for young Africans who are interested in working at the World Bank. The jobs are stationed both at the headquarters in Washington, DC and the Africa country offices. All of these opportunities are paid and require fluency in English. However, fluency in at least one other Bank language (French, Spanish, Russian, Arabic, Portuguese, or Chinese) is an advantage. As a young African, I encourage any fellow African youth to consider these opportunities and pass them along to interested peers.

Night life in #Africa: a fun twist to development

Maleele Choongo's picture
Apps and Clubs: Navigating (Night)life in Dakar
Agendakar is a web platform that connects users to local night life, restaurants, exhibitions, and other events in Dakar. Deme’s Agendakar is now the most popular event guide to Senegal's capital. Her staff of four young Africans collect event dates, program, code, and write articles about the city’s latest novelties. The app reduces costs associated with mobile web services by allowing users to download it for free and use it offline.

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