Syndicate content

Social Development

What can we do about gender-based violence and violence against children in infrastructure projects?

Inka Schomer's picture



You are young, poor, living in a remote rural area, and one day your whole life is turned upside down by a sexual assault. No matter whether the offender is your partner or spouse, another family member, a teacher, a co-worker or a stranger, you will need to make choices.

Putting Ideas to practice: one stop in the journey of “Inclusion Matters”

Maitreyi Bordia Das's picture
As a concept, social inclusion can be taught. Photo: World bank

I am often asked—what happened as a result of the World Bank’s 2013 flagship report, Inclusion Matters? It made a big splash in the world of ideas but what did it do to improve people’s lives? This is not to say that ideas don’t affect the lives of people, but ideas need to percolate into practice. How do we know if a report has been relevant for development practice?

Paris Léona, a community at the heart of development

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français
© Dasan Bobo /World Bank


The story of a country’s economic development is often told through the lens of new roads, factories, power lines, and ports. However, it can also be told through the voices of every day heroes, individuals who have taken action to improve their lives and those around them. In this blog series, the World Bank Group, in partnership with the Ivorian newspaper Fraternité Matin and blogger Edith Brou, tells the stories of those individuals who, with a boost from a Bank project, have set economic development in motion in their communities.

“Preparing kabato used to be a grueling task,” explains Salimata Koné, a resident in the village of Paris Léona, located some 500 kilometers to the north west of Abidjan. The women in the village usually had to toil away with mortars and pestles to produce this corn meal that fed the entire family. This laborious activity ended when Salimata Koné and other women in the village participated in the budget discussions led by the village chief, providing them with the opportunity to acquire a mill in their community. Since then, life has been much easier.

10 Knowledge Products from Sub-Saharan Africa You Don’t Want to Miss

Daniella Van Leggelo-Padilla's picture
Examine, evaluate, analyze, and explore… The World Bank Group’s comprehensive research, reports, and knowledge products do just that, providing policy makers and stakeholders from all sectors across Africa access to reliable evidenced-based data to assist in their decision-making processes.

Making local voices count: How Senegal and Tunisia inspire each other on governance reform

Salim Rouhana's picture
Also available in: Français

Also available in: Español

Photo: Mo Ibrahim Foundation / Flickr Creative Commons

Six years ago, a revolution started in Tunisia with an unemployed young Tunisian in a secondary city desperate to make his voice heard. This revolution reshaped the country’s development agenda and triggered a decentralization process to give more say to local governments in policymaking. Since then, the World Bank’s work on local governance in Tunisia has expanded from equipping municipalities with basic services into tackling the diverse challenges of decentralization: institutional reform, participatory processes, transparency and accountability, capacity building, and performance assessment.

Women and girls are the answer to innovation in Africa

Maleele Choongo's picture
4 Will You Take On... Take On Extreme Poverty 2:11 / 2:11 Poverty and Hardship in the PacificWorld Bank1:02:02 Rwanda: A Model for Building Strong Safety NetsWorld Bank4:32 My New Life: Primary Education for All in IndiaWorld Bank4:39 Applis mobiles pour
Women in Senegal traditionally have few chances to acquire computer or programming skills. A young woman from Dakar has set out to change that. Binta Coudy De has created a tech hub, Jjiguene Tech Hub, that trains young women in computer and programming skills, preparing them for a career in the high-tech sector.

According the World Bank’s latest report on the state of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) research in Africa, African researchers produce only 1 percent of the world’s research.

As shown in this video, unlocking the talent of women and girls could improve the quality and quantity of scientific research and tech innovation in Africa.

“Think Jobs”: What I Learned as a Participant in the World Bank’s “Think Jobs” Debate Competition

Delia Banda's picture
Delia Banda is a student of Zambia’s Copperbelt University. She recently won “Best Debater” during a televised debate series on jobs and unemployment that was sponsored by the World Bank Zambia Country Office.

The Angola paradox: Development aid in a "wealthy" country

Thomas Dickinson's picture
Also available in: Français



Preparing a recent project mission to Angola, I came across the country’s latest accomplishment: a gigantic new refinery to consolidate its national oil industry. Looking at that massive structure, I was hit with a sudden thought: if they can pull off such an enormous and complex feat of engineering, what do they need me for?

Development: Made in Africa

Maleele Choongo's picture
From Slums to Cocktail Parties - African Jewelry is Trending

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to the world’s highest female entrepreneurial activity, according to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor Women’s Report. Approximately 27% of African women are engaged in some form of entrepreneurial venture. Among these women is Kate Mahugu, cofounder of Shopsoko.com.

Pages