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Challenges faced by women in entrepreneurship

Charlotte Horore Bebga's picture
Also available in: Français
Charlotte Horore Bebga, IT professional and entrepreneur, leads a coding workshop for children at the U.S. Embassy in Cameroon.


Sub-Saharan Africa is the only region in the world where women are more likely than men to be entrepreneurs, according to a new World Bank report. Women are thus key stakeholders in the economic development of the continent, which is replete with boundless opportunities. Although there are increasing numbers of women involved in and benefiting from these opportunities, they still face many different kinds of problems and restrictions. I myself have experienced this in my career as a female entrepreneur.

Networking: the key to growth for women entrepreneurs

Affiong Williams's picture
Also available in: Français
Photo: ReelFruit


“It takes a village to raise a business” is my rendition of the popular proverb, “It takes a village to raise a child.” As a woman who has been building a dried fruit processing and distribution business for the past seven years in Nigeria, nothing has accelerated its growth- financially and otherwise - more than my growing network. A robust network builds the social capital that can lead to greater collaboration and credibility, funding and emotional support for female entrepreneurs.

Profiting from parity: Addressing constraints to support women-owned businesses

Rachel Coleman's picture


Persistence, strength, tenacity and passion are just a few ways that some of Sub-Saharan Africa’s successful business women describe the secret to their success. This isn’t surprising; in Africa, women are more likely to be working than women in other regions, and they are more likely to be entrepreneurs than men. So, it makes sense these women have a resilience and power unmatched by many others. 

Helping women market traders in Mozambique unlock their sales potential

Luize Guimaraes's picture
Also available in: Português
Photo: Daniel Jack/World Bank

It’s 40 degrees Celsius and our skin is sticky. There is so much noise, people constantly moving, taxi drivers screaming directions, prices shouted, and sellers calling out to clients. The sun is rising, but inside the market it is completely dark. Pieces of cloth and large plastic bags protect the stalls, the food and the people from the rising heat of the day. The place looks like a beehive of activity.

The power of investing in girls in Tanzania

Quentin Wodon's picture

Mwajuma* was 15 in rural Shinyanga when her parents informed her she would not be going to school anymore – she was getting married. She never objected. Several of her peers had similarly had their schooling terminated and were already busy taking care of their own families. Neither did she object to the fact she was to be the second wife – this too was commonplace among her peers. But the marriage did not last.

The challenge of urban mobility in Abidjan

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français



I am often asked how I view Côte d’Ivoire’s economic future. One thing is certain: the country will become urbanized. More than half the population already lives in the city and this proportion is expected to reach two thirds by 2050, particularly with the expansion of Abidjan, which will be home to over 10 million people.

Introducing “transformational constitutionalism” to Zimbabwe’s most vulnerable

Matilda Rutendo Nengare's picture



The 2018 Law, Justice and Development Week (LDJ) Week competition period coincided with presidential and parliamentary elections in my home country of Zimbabwe. I decided to submit my proposal, as the issue of “Rights, Protection and Development” was a topical issue I had already been reflecting on. Additionally, I have a particular interest in how the law and human rights coincide with economic development in developing and vulnerable states.

Despite adhering to a system of constitutional supremacy, the Constitution remains “a paper tiger” for many citizens. Given the predominance of agrarianism, more than 67% of Zimbabweans reside in the rural areas. The provisions of the Constitution remain an abstract and primarily meaningless concept for many. This is concerning for a system premised on multi-party democracy, universal adult suffrage and free and fair regular elections.

Creating opportunities for a new forestry economy in Mozambique

Karin Kaechele's picture
With natural forests covering 43% of the country, forests are a source of employment, income, and livelihoods in Mozambique’s rural areas. Photo: Andrea Borgarello/World Bank


When I tell people that I am a forest specialist, they sometimes assume my work is forest first, people second. But the really exciting part of my job is that better forests make better communities.

There is mounting evidence that forest management improves people’s livelihoods all over the world. Standing forests are worth much more than cut ones and we are setting out to prove this in Mozambique, where protecting forests is among the fastest and most affordable ways to cut emissions and promote sustainable development.

Protecting the interests of persons with disabilities

Zainab Mukhtar's picture
Disabled people are among the most vulnerable populations in developing countries such as Nigeria, as they lack equal access and opportunity. Photo: 2018 European Union (photo by Samuel Ochai)


The popular saying“do not judge a book by its cover” teaches a great lesson which can be summed up in one sentence: It is never what we think it is.

This leads me to why protecting the interests of persons with disabilities (PWDs) is important; many times, they are treated as if all they are is their physical or mental challenges. But they are more than just their disability. Every human being, rich or poor, small or big, non-disabled or disabled has a role to play in our lives, and our ability to treat everyone with dignity and respect cannot be overemphasized. Thus, as I explained in my recent proposal in the World Bank Group’s 2018 Law Student Contest for Development Solutions, lack of equal access and opportunity for PWDs will in the long-run impede the necessary development many of us desire in our world.

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