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More Jobs. It is possible!

Edgar Buberwa's picture



Developing countries like Tanzania are experiencing an unforeseen youth bulge—a high proportion of young people aged 15 to 24. Sadly, this growth is not matched by an equivalent rise in economic opportunities for the youth. Thus, most youth are either unemployed or engaged in activities with low productivity. There are solutions to this problem.

Look no further than Uber, Airbnb...

Michael Paul Mollel's picture


Meet Ibrahim, 27, a 2015 Agronomy graduate from Tanzania’s Sokoine University of Agriculture, one of the leading agricultural colleges in Sub-Saharan Africa. You would expect him to be dressed in blue overalls, working on one of the largest plantations near Arusha, in Basutu or Ngarenairobi, where they grow barley and wheat.
 
However, Ibrahim sits in a comfy chair at his office in Morogoro, supervising three ICT graduates employed by his company. Indeed, it is becoming normal to major in chemistry at university only to practice “algebra”—as they say—in real life.

Let’s harness the data revolution to promote agriculture and create jobs

Aidan Constantine Nzumi's picture



Agriculture is the backbone of many African economies, employing the most citizens in most countries, citizens who produce food for consumption and raw materials for industries. With the current data revolution, and the explosion of new data sources available in Tanzania, we can push for the integrated use of mechanization, fertilizers, and digital technologies to get more efficiency and productivity in our agriculture.

It is possible to boost opportunities for Tanzania’s youth

Charles Kapondo's picture



The 2015 Economic Report on Africa by the United Nations Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) put Tanzania’s unemployment rate at 10.3 percent. It also reported that the number of unemployed women in the country is higher than that of unemployed men.
 
But there are a number of ways in which we can boost job opportunities for youth in Tanzania.

How remittances help the poor but not the most vulnerable Somalis

Utz Pape's picture
Somalis make a living in the harshest of natural environments. Photo: Hassan Hirsi/World Bank


One year ago, we did not know how many Somalis were poor and how programs and policies could help to reduce poverty or at least build resilience against falling deeper into poverty. We knew that Somalis receive an estimated $1.4 billion (24 percent of GDP) in remittances every year. But we did not know whether the poor received the remittances and whether they helped mitigate the impact of poverty. To overcome this dearth of information, we implemented the Somali High Frequency Survey and established a near real-time market price monitoring system.

Beyond Mopane worms: Zimbabwe's prospects for economic growth under climate variability

Pablo Benitez's picture
Zimbabwe’s fields and forests are becoming drier. Photo: Arne Hoel/World Bank


Dried, mopane worms are traditionally offered to foreigners visiting Zimbabwe as a welcoming snack. Not really worms at all, they are the caterpillars of the Emperor moth (Gonimbrasia belina), hand-picked from mopane trees in the wild, their names “madora” in Shona and “amacimbi” in Ndebele a testament to their local popularity.

Africa can Benefit from Nature-based Tourism in a Sustainable Manner

Magda Lovei's picture
Also available in: Français
Up close and personal: an elephant encounters tourists in Tanzania. Photo: Magda Lovei/World Bank


Africa’s unique natural assets—its iconic wildlife, snow-capped mountains, waterfalls, rapids, majestic forests, unique bird populations, pristine beaches and coral reefs—represent tremendous value. Wonders of nature such as Mt Kilimanjaro, Mt Kenya, and the Victoria Falls, as well as Zanzibar’s Stone Town and its beautiful beaches, and the wildebeest migration between the Masai Mara and Serengeti, are some of the world’s best-known tourist attractions.

Practicing what you preach: Mozambique’s natural resource management

André Rodrigues de Aquino's picture
Also available in: Português
The World Bank is supporting an increase in rural jobs and investment while promoting sustainable land management to conserve Mozambique’s natural wealth. Photo: Andrea Borgarello/World Bank

As my plane lands in Maputo, I am welcomed home by blankets of turquoise waters edged in creamy ribbons of sand, and swaths of greens in every shade, from scrubby mangroves to unique coastal forests endemic to Maputaland. But I also see rapidly sprawling human settlements and degraded areas where forests once flourished.

In Benin, Can Resilient Investment Solutions Save a Battered Coast?

James Close's picture
Also available in: Français
Rapidly rising sea levels in Benin lend new meaning to castles built on sand. Photo: Jonathan Marks/FlickR


I was raised in a small town called Hornsea on England’s east coast, a magnificent place that attracts tourists but is eroding faster than the rest of Europe. Some of the impressive, clay cliffs are literally crumbling. Local roads and the old settlement and have fallen into the sea. More than once, forward-planning residents have demolished and rebuilt their houses from salvaged materials as their coast recedes.

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