Syndicate content

Engaging the Private Sector in the Quest for Universal Energy Access in Africa

Lucio Monari's picture

Sub-Saharan Africa is still largely in the dark when it comes to access to electricity. Fewer than three out of 10 of the region’s people have grid-based access to electricity which is essential for education, agriculture, healthcare and business, and where it has been installed, it is all too often patchy, costly and unreliable.

Wanjiku’s Story: One Woman, a Common Experience

Asa Torkelsson's picture

One Sunday, I was invited for a late lunch at the house of Dorcas Wanjiku Njoroge in Thika. Deeply seated in armchairs in the living room, we enjoyed sukuma wiki, ugali and a bit of cooked meat while she told me the story of her life.

Today is International Women’s Day, and the empowerment of rural women is the theme of the ongoing 56th session of the Commission on the Status of Women. At the World Bank, it is a day to “think equal and to act equal.”

It is in this context that I share the life of Wanjiku, as told by her.

Wanjiku was born on in 1933 at a tea farm in Kiambu where her parents worked. As she grew up, she took care of the many children at the farm and was not taken to school, as her father did not see the use of education to a girl.

2012 Social Media as a Tool for Citizen Feedback

Victoire Ngounoue's picture

More often than not, “we” criticize the “system” for being corrupt; yet it is simply a reflection of what we make of it. For example, what would happen if “we” decided never to collect bribes from users in our health service system? Or if we implemented and respected the rule of ‘first come, first served’ instead of paying or collecting bribes for faster service delivery? What would happen when it is brought to our knowledge that there are irregular practices operating within our health centers?

Taking the pulse: The evolving health public-private partnership in Lesotho

Patricio V. Marquez's picture

Jean J. De St Antoine and Kanako Yamashita-Allen are co-authors of this post.

During a recent visit to Maseru, we met with staff at the 425-bed Queen ’Mamohato Memorial Hospital which opened in October 2011 and at one of three primary care clinics that have been running since 2010 as part of a Ministry of Health (MOH)--led public private partnership (PPP).  The PPP aims to facilitate access to quality health services in a poor country.   

Tanzania: Building bridges through education and small businesses

Jacques Morisset's picture

Stevan Lee, Senior World Bank Economist, is co-author of this post.

Attracted by the prospects of large unexploited natural gas reserves in the south of Tanzania, big players are in town. The British Gas Group has publicly announced that it may invest over US$35 billion in the next 25 years – 1.5 times Tanzania’s current GDP. Policymakers and donors are jockeying to position themselves and understand what is at stake.

What can we do to help Africans trade with each other?

Paul Brenton's picture

Uganda has become a successful exporter of education services to countries in East Africa. In West Africa, Nigerian financial institutions have expanded branch networks throughout the region making available the benefits of scale to consumers in very small countries. African supermarket chains are spreading throughout the continent. These are some of the successes Africa is seeing as it fights to integrate the market for regional trade in services.

What's the Diaspora Got to Do with It?

Richard Cambridge's picture

In response to this intriguing question, raised by Dele Fatunla on the Diaspora Debate blog at African Arguments Online, we believe the Diaspora is a rich source of much-needed human and financial capital that ought to be better leveraged to benefit Africans on the continent.

After the holidays, a time to reflect on the state of food in Africa

Ian Gillson's picture

As we gather in kitchens and dining rooms during this season of eating and charity, let us pause for a moment to review the state of food trade in Africa: how does cross-border commerce in key crops fare on a continent with pockets of harsh weather and unpredictable politics? How is the traffic in grains and tubers?

It’s clear that prices are high, following the February 2011 peak worldwide. The price of maize in Nairobi has tripled this year alone, while the price of a 50 kg bag of rice in Dakar has risen from $36 to $43.50. These spikes can be blamed partly on increased demand for food crops – including for biofuel production in Europe and the United States. They are also due to supply-side factors, such as higher energy prices which impact transportation and fertilizer costs, and weak harvests in large exporting countries.

But on a global scale there is no food shortage. In 2010, the world produced 2.2 billion tons of cereals, up from 820 million tons 50 years ago (a 268 percent increase). Over the same period, the world’s population has grown from three billion to seven billion people: an increase of 233 percent. In Africa, food staple production is abundant in some areas even though the continent is a net importer of food. Mali grows enough excess sorghum to supply its neighbors, and Uganda, the bread basket of East Africa, makes regular shipments of maize to Kenya, Southern Sudan and Rwanda. The problem is that the surplus food does not always get to those in need. Often shipments of perishable goods are stopped at the border and excessive inspections frequently cause delays.

Brazil and Africa: Bridging the Atlantic

Susana Carrillo's picture

Linked in the distant past through colonial-era trade enterprises, Brazil and Africa are becoming close partners again. More than two centuries after establishing a slave trade route across the Atlantic, both regions are again re-engaging, this time to exchange knowledge and further economic and social development.

Sub-Saharan African countries are looking to replicate Brazil’s successes in boosting agricultural production and exports, and private investments, which have made Brazil a key economic player in the international arena. This is no coincidence. The world is going though rapid changes, resulting in a new financial architecture, with emerging economies and countries in the South increasingly participating and influencing global decisions.

Pages