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February 2019

The challenge of urban mobility in Abidjan

Jacques Morisset's picture
Also available in: Français



I am often asked how I view Côte d’Ivoire’s economic future. One thing is certain: the country will become urbanized. More than half the population already lives in the city and this proportion is expected to reach two thirds by 2050, particularly with the expansion of Abidjan, which will be home to over 10 million people.

Introducing “transformational constitutionalism” to Zimbabwe’s most vulnerable

Matilda Rutendo Nengare's picture



The 2018 Law, Justice and Development Week (LDJ) Week competition period coincided with presidential and parliamentary elections in my home country of Zimbabwe. I decided to submit my proposal, as the issue of “Rights, Protection and Development” was a topical issue I had already been reflecting on. Additionally, I have a particular interest in how the law and human rights coincide with economic development in developing and vulnerable states.

Despite adhering to a system of constitutional supremacy, the Constitution remains “a paper tiger” for many citizens. Given the predominance of agrarianism, more than 67% of Zimbabweans reside in the rural areas. The provisions of the Constitution remain an abstract and primarily meaningless concept for many. This is concerning for a system premised on multi-party democracy, universal adult suffrage and free and fair regular elections.

Creating opportunities for a new forestry economy in Mozambique

Karin Kaechele's picture
With natural forests covering 43% of the country, forests are a source of employment, income, and livelihoods in Mozambique’s rural areas. Photo: Andrea Borgarello/World Bank


When I tell people that I am a forest specialist, they sometimes assume my work is forest first, people second. But the really exciting part of my job is that better forests make better communities.

There is mounting evidence that forest management improves people’s livelihoods all over the world. Standing forests are worth much more than cut ones and we are setting out to prove this in Mozambique, where protecting forests is among the fastest and most affordable ways to cut emissions and promote sustainable development.

Protecting the interests of persons with disabilities

Zainab Mukhtar's picture
Disabled people are among the most vulnerable populations in developing countries such as Nigeria, as they lack equal access and opportunity. Photo: 2018 European Union (photo by Samuel Ochai)


The popular saying“do not judge a book by its cover” teaches a great lesson which can be summed up in one sentence: It is never what we think it is.

This leads me to why protecting the interests of persons with disabilities (PWDs) is important; many times, they are treated as if all they are is their physical or mental challenges. But they are more than just their disability. Every human being, rich or poor, small or big, non-disabled or disabled has a role to play in our lives, and our ability to treat everyone with dignity and respect cannot be overemphasized. Thus, as I explained in my recent proposal in the World Bank Group’s 2018 Law Student Contest for Development Solutions, lack of equal access and opportunity for PWDs will in the long-run impede the necessary development many of us desire in our world.

Nigeria immunization “app” makes a global impact

Tochukwu Egesi's picture
Tochukwu Egesi joined hundreds of young people from around the world to present their ideas for tackling development challenges during the 2018 World Bank Youth Summit, Unleashing the Power of Human Capital.


As the Nigeria government successfully rolled out its vaccination plan in 2018, some parents living in rural areas encountered challenges finding out where, when, or how often their children were meant to receive vaccinations. This confusion caused delayed and repeated immunizations, increasing the risk of infant and child mortality from preventable diseases.

Hotel Ghana, a home away from home: Strengthening support for vulnerable refugees in Ghana

Mawunya Etsa Amanda Kudu's picture
More than 30,000 Togolese sought asylum in Ghana and other neighboring countries following the 2005 election results. Photo: UNHCR/D. Kamphuis


As of the end of 2016, thousands of refugees and asylum-seekers were registered in my home country of Ghana, with more than half of them girls, women and persons with disabilities.

The inaugural World Bank Group Law, Justice and Development Week 2018 Law Student Contest for Development Solutions, was  a great opportunity to contribute to the timely discussion on rights, protection and development of vulnerable groups, particularly refugees.

Legal initiatives for refugees in Uganda

Colman Ntungwerisho's picture
Children make up more than half of the refugee population in Uganda. Photo: Jay Hsu, flickr


According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the refugee population in Uganda is estimated at 1.15 million people. This makes Uganda one of the largest refugee-hosting countries in the world. South Sudan alone is the source of more than one million refugees, with 86% of these comprised of women and children. They occupy settlements in rural districts in Northern Uganda such as Adjumani, Moyo and Arua. It is also the home to one of the world’s biggest refugee camp, Bidi Bidi, which hosts a quarter of a million refugees.

An effective legal and referral system is critical to addressing gender-based violence

Margarita Puerto Gómez's picture
Nkingo Girls’ Club members enjoy each other’s company after their weekly meeting to discuss reproductive health and receive life skills and leadership training. Photo: World Bank/Globe Video

For the World Bank’s partner governments, investing in roads and other infrastructure development is critical to driving growth and reducing poverty. At the same time, adverse social impacts can occur if social risks are not properly assessed, mitigated and managed. In particular, projects that involve large labor influxes—such as road construction projects in rural areas—can contribute to an increased risk of gender-based violence in the local community, including sexual exploitation and abuse of women and adolescent girls.