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September 2017

Many around the world worry about inequality, especially women

Jing Guo's picture

In recent decades, income inequality has risen in most of the developed world and many developing countries. There are plenty of reasons to be worried about income inequality, as it often leads to unequal life opportunities, exacerbates disparities in health and life expectancy, and jeopardizes social unity.

While most of research work on inequality tends to focus on the poor, a recent World Bank Group survey set out to explore how the opinion leaders—who are often economically better-off—perceive the growing gap between the rich and the poor.

The survey interviewed more than 10,000 key opinion leaders[1] in fifty-two developing countries to find out 1) how concerned they are about income inequality, and 2) whether they perceived a link between equality of opportunity and poverty reduction.

Let’s take a look at the key findings.

Income inequality

The survey data show that majorities of opinion leaders in all but two countries (Uzbekistan and Belarus) perceived the gap between the rich and the poor as “a very big” or “moderately big problem” in their countries.

 

Causes of preventable and premature deaths vary across the globe

Emi Suzuki's picture

This blog is part of a series using data from World Development Indicators to explore progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals and their associated targets. The new Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017, published in April 2017, and the SDG Dashboard provide in-depth analyses of all 17 goals.

Communicable diseases cause more premature deaths in Sub-Saharan Africa than elsewhere in the world. But high rates of death through noncommunicable diseases are found in other regions as well. A higher number of health care professionals available to patients correlates with lower mortality before the age of 70, and, as newer drugs to prevent or treat disease come onto market, countries are seeing falls in the incidence of fatal diseases. Data from the World Bank’s World Development Indicators explores progress made towards the targets of Sustainable Development Goal 3, which promotes Good Health and Well-Being at all ages.

Sub-Saharan Africa bears the brunt of communicable diseases

AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria together affect hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and putting an end to these diseases is a priority under Goal 3 (target 3.3). People in Sub-Saharan Africa are more likely than those in other regions to become infected: 2.2 of every 1,000 uninfected people ages 15-49 contracted HIV in 2016; there were 276 new cases of tuberculosis per 100,000 people in 2015; and the incidence of malaria was 234 cases per 1,000 persons at risk.

However, the region has shown improvements in tackling these diseases, the incidence of new cases of HIV has declined by nearly two-thirds since 2000, the incidence of new cases of malaria by nearly a half, and the incidence of new cases of tuberculosis by a fifth over the same period.

A crisis in learning: 9 charts from the 2018 World Development Report

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Español | العربية | Français | 中文

There’s a crisis in learning. The quality and quantity of education vary widely within and across countries. Hundreds of millions of children around the world are growing up without even the most basic life skills.

The 2018 World Development Report draws on fields ranging from economics to neuroscience to explore this issue, and suggests improvements countries can make. You can get the full report here and to give you a flavor of what’s inside, I’ve pulled out a few of the charts and ideas that I found most striking while reading through it.

Each additional year of schooling raises earnings by 8-10 percent

 

The report sets out several arguments for the value of education. The clearest one for me? It’s a powerful tool for raising incomes. Each additional year of schooling raises an individual’s earnings by 8–10 percent, especially for women. This isn’t just because more able or better-connected people receive more education: “natural experiments” from a variety of countries - such as Honduras, Indonesia, Philippines, the U.S., and the U.K. - prove that schooling really does drive the increased earnings. More education is also linked with longer, healthier lives, and it has lasting benefits for individuals and society as a whole.

Deaths through childbirth are decreasing but some regions remain far from SDG targets

Emi Suzuki's picture

This blog is part of a series using data from World Development Indicators to explore progress towards the Sustainable Development Goals and their associated targets. The new Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2017, published in April 2017, and the SDG Dashboard provide in-depth analyses of all 17 goals.

Sustainable Development Goal 3—Good health and well-being—focuses its first two targets on the health of mothers, babies and young children. Target 3.1 aims to reduce the global maternal mortality ratio to fewer than 70 per 100,000 live births, while target 3.2 aims for neonatal mortality to be fewer than 12 per 1,000 live births, and under-5 mortality to be fewer than 25 per 1,000 births. And target 3.7 seeks to provide access to sexual and reproductive health to all, in order to reduce unwanted pregnancies and boost health during pregnancy. The World Bank’s World Development Indicators database includes data that allow us to track progress made by countries towards these 2030 goals.

Predicting perceptions of WBG Sectoral Support: Can Country Opinion Survey data help?

Svetlana Markova's picture
Also available in: Русский

The World Bank Group collects and analyzes feedback of its stakeholders systematically—on a three-year cycle—in all client countries. The Country Opinion Survey data helps the institution better understand local development context, enhance stakeholder engagement and partnerships, and improve its results on the ground. Tracking stakeholder opinions about effectiveness of the Bank Group’s sectoral support over time is crucial for assessing the progress on top development challenges in countries.

We continue looking at the education sector, as an example, to see how the Country Survey data can help country teams predict stakeholder perceptions and improve effectiveness of Bank’s sectoral work. Let’s look at the trending data, explore what drives the change in numbers, what can be projected for future and why, and how to work with stakeholder perceptions, using a targeted approach.

The first chart shows how the World Bank Group’s stakeholders—partners from the Government, ministries, civil society, private sector, and donor community—have changed their views on the Bank’s work in education in the Central Asian countries—Kazakhstan, the Kyrgyz Republic, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan—during the past years.[1]

 


Chart: What Are the World's Wettest Countries?

Tariq Khokhar's picture
Also available in: Français | Español | العربية

Africa has the world’s least developed weather, water, and climate observation network, with half of its surface weather stations not reporting accurate data. Hydrological and meteorological (“hydromet”) hazards are responsible for 90% of total disaster losses worldwide. Being able to understand, predict, and warn citizens about natural hazards and disasters drives the ability of governments to reduce economic risks and save lives.

The World Bank’s research shows that annually, countries can save US$13 billion in asset losses alone by investing in hydromet services. This week, Africa’s first-ever ministerial level Meteorology Hydromet Forum formally recognizes the role hydromet services play in development.

Achieving good budgetary governance: What have we learned from PEFA in the past decade?

Lewis Hawke's picture

The national budget is the primary document through which governments present their plans and the resources, including taxes, they intend to collect to fund them.

Many countries present both national and sectoral strategies that identify policy priorities to be funded through the budget. For example, the health sector could include details of policies to provide vaccination on a range of diseases and details of citizens' access to specific healthcare services.

A government's inability to implement the national budget as planned could be a sign of lack of capacity to forecast revenues and expenditures adequately or an inability to properly cost financial impact of government policies, or quite commonly a mixture of all of these issues.

However, in many cases the reason why governments are unable to execute budgets as planned could be, at least partially due to exogenous factors, such as natural disasters, armed conflicts, or increased level of migration flows.

The Sustainable Development Goals—target 16.6—recognize that providing a sound basis for development requires that government budgets are comprehensive, transparent, and realistic.

This is measured through the Public Expenditure and Financial Accountability (PEFA)[1] indicator that assesses the difference between planned and actual budget expenditure in countries across the world.

Since 2005, 147 countries and 178 subnational governments have carried out a PEFA assessment, with national spending more likely to be on target than subnational spending.

Introducing Data360R — data to the power of R

Reg Onglao's picture
 

Last January 2017, the World Bank launched TCdata360 (tcdata360.worldbank.org/), a new open data platform that features more than 2,000 trade and competitiveness indicators from 40+ data sources inside and outside the World Bank Group. Users of the website can compare countries, download raw data, create and share data visualizations on social media, get country snapshots and thematic reports, read data stories, connect through an application programming interface (API), and more.